Three Comrades (A Novel by Erich Maria Remarque)
A screenplay
by F. Scott Fitzgerald for the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc.


Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc.
Three Comrades
From: F. Scott Fitzgerald
9/1/37

CAST:
Erich LohkampRobert Taylor
Patricia HollmannMargaret Sullavan
Otto Koster Franchot Tone
Gottfried LenzRobert Young
Dr. BeckerHenry Hull
AftonsGuy Kibbee
BreuerLionel Atwill
Mrs. SchultzSarah Padden
Local DoctorCharley Grapewin
Dr. JafféMonty Woolley

1 FADE IN:

A GERMAN FLAG—
—surmounted by a MAGNIFICENT BRONZE IMPERIAL EAGLE, waving against a white sky.

CUT TO:

2 A FRENCH SEVENTY-FIVE GUN—
—in action. It fires.

CUT TO:

3 THE FLAGPOLE—
—newly split, the eagle gone, the shredded flag fluttering on the remnant of the pole.

DISSOLVE TO:

4 A CORNER OF A MILITARY WAREHOUSE—
—where a pile of rifles mounts rapidly higher as other rifles are laid upon it.

CUT TO:

5 A PILE OF GERMAN HELMETS—
—added to as other helmets are thrown upon it.

DISSOLVE TO:

6 TITLE:

“DURING THE NINETEEN-TWENTIES WHILE THE WORLD WAS PROSPEROUS THE GERMANS WERE A BEATEN AND IMPOVERISHED PEOPLE.”

DISSOLVE TO:

7 EXT. OF A FOOD DEPOT; THE BEGINNING OF AN ENDLESS QUEUE OF PEOPLE—
—the poor, the middle-class, returned soldiers, children, tramps, all waiting with baskets or ret­icules in a quarter-mile bread-line. It turns a corner and winds around a block as the CAMERA TRUCKS along beside it.

At the very end are a rather haughty aristocratic woman and a lovely, thin, wan-faced little girl of about thirteen who looks on the verge of starvation. A Red Cross Doctor struck by the distinguished aspect of the unhappy pair, stops for a moment beside them.

Doctor: That little girl needs white bread and potatoes.

A demobilized officer and two soldiers overhear the conversation as they pass along the sidewalk and pause.

The Woman (with a short, scornful laugh): What, bread!—Is there such a thing? And potatoes—this child wouldn't recognize a potato if she saw one.

The Doctor (very sadly): Ach! Later in life these growing children will suffer for all this.

CUT TO:

8 THE THREE SOLDIERS—
—saddened. The officer, most matured of the three, wears a head bandage. His name is Otto Koster. The second, impetuous, fiery and smouldering, decorated with the Iron Cross of both classes, is Gottfried Lenz. The youngest, still lighthearted and carefree after a short experience at the front, is Bobby Lohkamp. We only establish the three as a group and immediately—

DISSOLVE TO:

9 A GRAPH—
—to show the passage of ten years. A line drawn from the upper left to the lower right of the graph, is marked “National Wealth of Germany.” A mov­ing pen draws another line which crosses the first line and moves always upward. This line is marked “Cost of Living.” As this insert is primarily for a time lapse, the dates on the graph should be very large. When the pen stops under 1928—: DISSOLVE TO:

10 A SIGN READING: “GASOLINE, 1 M. 40 Pfg.”

We hear a full-bellied laugh of derision. The CAMERA PANS DOWN to show an automobile in front of a suburban filling station. It is a paintless touring car with split fenders that do not match, and windshield patched with adhesive tape.

In it sit the Three Comrades, wearing mechanics' jumpers. They are a little older. Koster wears eye­glasses and shows a large scar on his forehead.Bobby Lohkamp is the sprucer of the three, even to sporting a flower behind his ear. The man laughing is the filling station attendant, holding a water-can. The Comrades look at him with an expression which says, “Funny, are we? Oh yeah?”

The Attendant (convulsed): That ain't one car. That's made out of ten cars. You ought to have ten licenses. Should I give you a push?

Pityingly the Comrades exchange a glance. Then Otto Koster steps on it, Bobby Lohkamp flicks the flower at the attendant, and they leave the filling station in such a burst of speed that the man jumps back and stares in astonishment.

CUT TO:

11 A SUBURBAN ROAD. AFTERNOON

The Comrades, bowling along leisurely, are passed by a reckless motor-cyclist, veering from one side of the road to the other. He holds his place an­noyingly in front of the Comrades' car, which will shortly be introduced as “Heinrich” (Note: I have put “Heinrich” instead of “Karl” because the latter is so like “car” that it would be a source of confusion.); and the Comrades don't like it. We come to:

12 A CROSSROAD ON A RISE OF GROUND.

Neither city nor country; a few scattered houses and signboards.

The car, “Heinrich,” approaches. It begins to pass the cyclist, but slows up at the crossroad warning. But the motorcyclist curves narrowly around in front of a Ford coming out of the side road, and goes on his way.

CUT TO:

13 A CLOSE UP OF THE COMRADES IN THEIR CAR.

Koster: Look at that half-wit!

Lenz: That's done it!

CUT TO:

14 THE FORD FROM THE SIDE ROAD—
—skids and overturns smashingly in the road.

CUT TO:

15 KOSTER—
—slams on his brakes and barely avoids crashing into the overturned car. Instantly the three Comrades jump out and run to the wreck. Koster has a slight limp.

CUT TO:

16 THE DRIVER OF THE FORD—
—Puppi, a baker about fifty, soft, stout, sharp-looking, unattractive, is pinned between the wheel and the seat. The motor is still running at high speed, but as Lenz turns it off, the man's groans are audible. Koster, an exceptionally strong man, bends back the wheel while the other two pull Puppi out.

Lenz: Easy now.

Bobby Lohkamp (gritting his teeth): His ribs are crushed—I can feel.

Koster (panting): There's a hospital up the road.

They place the man in “Heinrich”.

Koster (to Bobby): You stay here and keep an eye on it. (he indicates the wreck) May mean a repair job for us.

Koster drives off, with Lenz beside him, holding the half-unconscious baker in his arms.

DISSOLVE TO:

17 INT. THE RECEPTION ROOM OF A SMALL HOSPITAL.

The injured man is on an examination table. The Doctor looks up and speaks to Koster and Lenz.

The Doctor: Might have been worse. Couple of ribs broken. He'd better stay here.

Puppi (feebly): What about my car? (to Lenz and Koster) Will you see about the car? (struggles for breath) Telephone a garage.

Lenz (hinting): We run a repair shop ourselves.

Koster: We'll tow it in if you want us to take care of it for you.

Puppi: All right—all right. Do what's necessary. My name's Manfred Puppi.

Koster (taking out a card): My name's Otto Koster. (puts the card in Puppi's pocket)

Lenz (consolingly): It was the motorcycle's fault, and we've got his number.

DISSOLVE TO:

18 THE ROAD. KOSTER AND LENZ—
—driving rapidly back to the damaged car.

Koster: This is a God-send. First job in a week. I don't mind saying I've been uneasy.

Lenz: So have I—you lose your nerve on one meal a day.

Koster: And it's a big job too—radiator smashed, wheel crushed— (he breaks off) What's the excitement?

Lenz, staring ahead, sees:

19 THE SUBURBAN CROSSROADS

People have gathered around the wrecked car. Bobby, his arms folded, stands defiantly in front of it. Facing him are four men in mechanics' clothes, tough eggs with mean fighting faces. A wrecking truck, marked “Vogt Brothers” is drawn up behind them.

The Biggest Vogt Brother (to Bobby): Get going, or we'll push your face in!

Bobby: I told you this was our job.

CUT TO:

20 “Heinrich”—
—coming to rest beside the group.

Koster (to Lenz): Looks like a tough bunch. They're going to need persuasion. Where's a wrench?

He takes off his glasses and groping for a wrench, puts it in his rear pocket.

Lenz (indignant): The dirty robbers! (he closes his hand on a bunch of keys) Too bad I've got on my best shoes.

Koster (getting out): Watch it—we're three against four.

CUT TO:

21 KOSTER AND LENZ—
—approaching the wreck.

Biggest Vogt (to Bobby): Don't talk tripe or you'll need repairs yourself.

Koster and Lenz range themselves beside Bobby.

Koster: We've got permission from the owner to do the job.

Another Vogt Brother (producing a tire wrench from behind his back): How would you like another scar on your fat face?

Koster: That took a machine gun.

Biggest Vogt (still sure of himself): Three of you, eh?

Lenz: No, four.

Another Brother (looking around): Go on—he's kidding.

Lenz (dryly): You can't see him—his name is Justice.

Biggest Vogt (to his brother): Give us that trolley.

One brother takes hold of the cable that swings from his derrick and walks forward. Bobby stands in his way—Vogt tries to shove by, and in a minute, the fight is on. It is a great fight—three canny veterans against four young toughs. We get flashes of:

22 KOSTER—
—fighting coolly on two fronts, starting to use his wrench and deciding not to.

23 BOBBY—
—down, apparently being choked to death, then free, and up again.

24 LENZ—
—attacked with a tire wrench, knocking the man out with his improvised brass knuckles.

25 ONE OF THE BYSTANDERS—
—a goofy, goggle-eyed peasant, jumping up and down and clapping in ecstacy whenever the battle turns in favor of the Comrades, almost weeping when it goes against them.

26 THE FIGHT—
—has moved forward from the wrecked car toward the Vogt brothers' truck, which is parked on an incline. One Vogt is out cold. When Koster is momentarily free, he glances at Lenz who is fight­ing near the rear of the truck and has his opponent at a disadvantage.

Koster (crooks his finger and shouts to Lenz): The crane!

Lenz, struggling with his opponent, sees that the hook of the derrick hangs free on its cable. He suddenly understands and, reaching for the hook, attaches it to the man's belt.

27 SIMULTANEOUSLY: KOSTER—
—has unset the emergency brake of the wrecking truck and given it a shove. The truck starts to roll and the Vogt brother gives a yell as he is pulled off with it, bumping along the ground.

28 THE OTHER BROTHERS—
—see, and yelling imprecations, start after their truck. As it passes out of the picture down the hill with one of them climbing aboard—

CUT TO:

29 THE THREE COMRADES—
—laughing in victory while the goofy peasant jumps up and down, clapping his hands with de­light.

Koster: Now we'll take the prize to port.

DISSOLVE TO:

30 EXT. KOSTER & CO. AUTO REPAIR SHOP

The shop is set in a factory district of tall chimneys and tenements. In front of it is the sign, and a gas pump is in front of an old, creaking gate. As Koster drives “Heinrich” in, pulling the wrecked Ford, we follow to:

31 THE REPAIR SHOP

A COURTYARD—
—in a canyon between big buildings. Part of it is a covered shed sheltering a couple of dismantled jallopies and a once-expensive Cadillac which pre­serves a certain gaudy style and is polished to a fare-you-well. It bears a sign, “For Sale.” In a corner is a one-story room which serves as an office. Under a tin roof extending from it are chairs and a rough table. Nearby, a sink with mechanics' soap. As the caravan halts, we see:

32 MATILDA—
—the charwoman, swaying rather drunkenly in the door of the office, then precipitately retiring.

Jupp, a boy of fifteen, freckled and spinakereared, coming forward eagerly as he wipes his hands on a piece of waste.

Jupp (before they can get out): A customer!—A customer! A guy came to look at the Cadillac! (he points toward it) He'll be back. (he stares at the Ford) Whew!

Koster (getting out of “Heinrich”): We picked it up on the road. It means pay for you, Jupp. Jupp looks at their dishevelled clothes, then at the car and at Bobby, who has a bruised cheek bone.

Jupp: Were you in the wreck?

Bobby: We were in a war. And we need a drink. (as he starts toward the sink) Fine business on my birthday.

Lenz (calling after him): Your birthday? How old?

Bobby (turning): Thirty.

Lenz: How do you feel?

Bobby (washing his hands at the sink): I feel like sixty and sixteen at once. I feel low as that creeper. (he kicks at a roller, used to get under cars)

Lenz (calling): What do you mean, low? If you're sixteen and sixty both, you're living two lives at once. (pause) It's a miracle. (Bobby disappears into the office):

Koster: Let him alone, Gottfried. Birthdays are no fun. That's when you look at yourself in the mirror and find you're only the same old heel after all. Let's get busy. (to Jupp) What's this about a customer?

Jupp: He said he'd be right back.

Lenz: Great snakes! If we can sell it, we can even pay the rent. Never mind the wreck. One more polish and we can ask another hundred.

Koster: Thick oil in the engine.

Lenz: More grease in the gears.

Koster: Deflate the tires for rough roads.

Lenz: Oil the bonnet. Hot water in the radiator.

They look toward the Cadillac with growing ex­citement as they talk.

Koster: Come on, Gottfried!

He and Lenz spring for the work shed.

CUT TO:

33 THE DINGY BUT SUNLIT OFFICE

A desk, surmounted by silver framed photograph of the Comrades in uniform; some chairs; street clothes on hooks and hangers; an open cupboard and a small table on which rests an empty bottle. We hear a woman's voice, singing “The Song of the Bold Hussar,” which dies hollowly away as the SCENE WIDENS to include Bobby coming in the door and Matilda, the charwoman, with her hand stretched toward the bottle. Seeing him, she stops, teetering like a drunken hippopotamus, and drops a broom from her other hand. She wears a dirty white headcloth, hitched-up skirt, apron and thick slippers.

Bobby (amused and annoyed): Why, Frau Stoes! Last night that bottle was full. I must have forgotten to lock it up.

Matilda (blinking and staring): Holy Saints! I wasn't expecting you.

Bobby: Evidently not. Was it good?

Matilda (involuntarily): It sure was. (recovering her dignity and wiping her mouth): This is very embarrassing. I simply can't understand it—

Bobby: I can. You're tight as a tick.

Matilda (at last thinking what to say): I only smelled it at first, Herr Lohkamp. Then I took a nip for my sciatica. Then the Devil got hold of me. (she draws herself up): Anyhow, you ought not to lead an old woman into temp­tation, leaving bottles about.

Bobby: It isn't the first time. (he takes another bottle from the cupboard and looks at it) You drank Herr Koster's best—and left the stuff we give to customers.

Matilda (grinning): I know what's good. But you won't tell, will you, Herr Loh­kamp?—and me a poor widow?

Bobby: Not this time.

Jupp bursts into the office.

Jupp: Herr Lohkamp! The customer—the customer!

He is closely followed by Lenz and Koster.

Lenz (to Bobby): We've got to sell that Cadillac.

(his eyes, shining with an idea, rove around the office)

CUT TO:

34 THE GATE—
—through which Blumenthal has just entered, looking about with the canny eye of a successful middle-aged business man. He has a dead-pan but not without humor.

35 THE OFFICE

Koster brushing his hair. Bobby looking out the window into the court.

Bobby: Look at that expression. Suspicious already.

Lenz (out of sight): Remember the prices. Ask seven thousand. If he's a low cur, take forty-five hundred; if he's a maniac, forty-four hundred. But at that price, a curse goes with it. Go down fighting with your fist on his wallet.

Koster: Right.

(he goes out)

Lenz (still out of sight): I'm going to put on an act.

Bobby follows Koster out.

CUT TO:

36 KOSTER—
—coming out of the office into the courtyard and meeting Blumenthal.

Koster (cordially): My name's Koster.

Blumenthal (offering his hand): Blumenthal.

Koster: You've come about the Cadillac? (Blumenthal nods) She's over here.

Blumenthal (dryly): So I see.

Koster gives him an appraising glance. They have walked across the courtyard. Bobby has started the engine of the car.

Koster (taking a long breath): Good motor, good tires, good paint, dandy running condition. And for a big body, that hood is remarkably light. (he turns off the engine and raises the hood) See, you can work it with one hand. (but he and Bobby struggle with four hands to close it. Then Koster bangs the doors and rattles the handles) Nothing worn. Tight as a glove. Try them. (he takes his hand away. The handle comes with it. He hastily replaces it. Bobby turns on the engine again. Blumenthal nods in a bored way) Windows stay put at any height. Unbreakable glass—and that's something— (he points at the battered Ford) —Why only today on the road—

Blumenthal (uninterested): All cars have unbreakable glass.

Koster (a little nervously): Horn— (Bobby sounds it) —pockets, seats, switchboard, lighter—Have a cigarette?

Blumenthal: I don't smoke.

CUT TO:

37 THE GATE

—which Lenz is banging shut as if he had just come in. He has removed his unionalls and is amazingly spruced up—coat, tie, hat, cane and pigskin gloves. He compares the office number with a newspaper in his hand and walks up to Koster.

Lenz: Is there a Cadillac for sale here? (Koster nods, speechless) Can I see it?

Bobby (playing up): Here it is. But perhaps you won't mind waiting a minute. Have a seat in the office.

Lenz listens to the engine which is still humming. His face is critical, then appreciative. He nods and goes toward the office.

Blumenthal (practically): What's the car cost?

Koster: Seven thousand marks— (more sternly) Seven thousand marks net.

Blumenthal (snorting): Too much.

Koster: If you drove it, you'd feel differently. How about a trial run?

Blumenthal: Trial runs don't prove anything. After you buy it you find out what's the matter. (Bobby and Koster look dismayed) No, I'll call you up. Good morning.

To their distress he suddenly turns away and strides very quickly out of the courtyard.

Koster (starting after him too late): Now, Mr. Blumenthal—

Mr. Blumenthal passes through the gate.

CUT TO:

38 THE OFFICE DOOR

Lenz coming out. He is hatless and coatless and is getting back into his work suit. The cane still dangles from his arm.

Lenz (proud of himself): Well? How did I do? I saw you were up against it, and I thought I'd lend a hand.

Koster (glum at missing the sale): I recognized my new suit.

Bobby: Where did you get the hot gloves?

Lenz: The Tax Collector left them. The cane too—

(he brandishes it; then breaks off suddenly and stares toward the gate)

Bobby (oblivious to this): You ought to go into vaudeville.

He sees the look in Lenz's eye and turns; Blu­menthal has come back in and is striding briskly across the court.

Koster (nervously): Oh—hello, Mr. Blumenthal.

Blumenthal (glancing at Lenz with amusement): I see—you make your customers work for you. All joking aside, what do you want for that bus?

Bobby (sternly): Seven thousand marks.

Koster (less sternly): Six thousand marks.

Blumenthal: I'll give you five thousand.

The Comrades groan.

Koster (pleadingly): Five thousand eight hundred.

Blumenthal: Five thousand five hundred—and you're tickled to death. I could easily knock you down another thousand. (a pause—the Comrades look at each other. They agree in silence) It's a go! I want it in three days—license, new plates and all.

Koster (really pleased): Sold! And we'll throw in these cut-glass ash trays.

(he takes one from a shelf and holds it up)

DISSOLVE TO:

39 A GLASS OF FOAMING BEER—
—held aloft by Koster. The Comrades and Jupp, with Matilda in the background, are gathered around the outdoor table.

Koster: —So I am proud to say that on the occasion of his thirtieth birthday, Bobby Lohkamp becomes a full-fledged member of the firm of Koster and Company.

(cheers)

Lenz (indicating bottles on the table): This stuff is as old as he is—and too good for this lousy hole. I move we go and have supper in the country—finish up a big day in the great outdoors. If we each take two bottles and put them in Heinrich, the road-spook—

General approval, as we

DISSOLVE TO:

40 “HEINRICH,” THE AUTOMOBILE—
—rolling leisurely along a country road at twilight. The Comrades are in street clothes. Koster is driv­ing; Lenz is looking at a newspaper and singing with Bobby.

Lenz and Bobby (in chorus): Hail to thee

—O'er the sea,

—Fatherland.[“Ubers Meer Gruss Ich Dich Heimatland,” a popular German song of the period.]

Koster (interrupting): You're in the fatherland. That song is for when you're away.

(a pause.)

Lenz (brooding): We are away. Is this the fatherland—torn with poverty and despair, without future, without hope?

Koster (soberly): We didn't talk like that in 1918 when things were worse.

Lenz: We still believed. And now, we've stopped believing. (pause) There's only work to make you forget that there's nothing to work for. (pause) Work and an occasional bottle.

Koster: What do you think of that gloomy talk, young Bobby? (Bobby, absorbed, doesn't answer) Answer your superior officer!

Bobby (recollecting himself): Excuse me. I must have a touch of Spring Fever.

CUT TO:

41 A HUGE BUICK TOWN CAR—
—drawing up and overtaking them. As it comes abreast, a hand appears momentarily in the window and discards a half-smoked cigarette, which lands with a shower of sparks in “Heinrich.”

CUT TO:

42 INTERIOR OF “HEINRICH”

The cigarette falls in Bobby's lap; he starts and gropes for it.

Koster (muttering fiercely): So you think you can pass our old Heinrich, do you?

Lenz: Little he knows that Heinrich has the great heart of a racer. Take him, Otto.

“Heinrich” has fallen a little behind the Buick—now he steps on it and draws abreast again. We see:

43 FOUR LIGHTS IN A ROW—
—the two crazy, patched eyes of “Heinrich,” and the big bright eyes of the Buick as they appear at a distance in the twilight and RACE TOWARD THE CAMERA.

Three times we see this, each time at a faster pace. Once, two other cars approach from the two sides of a crossroad, their lights stopping abruptly and making a great blurr, through which plunge the two racers.

CUT TO:

44 GLIMPSE OF THE COMRADES

Lenz's newspaper blown against his face.

CUT TO:

45 THE BUICK DRIVER'S FACE—
—set and annoyed as he pats the arm of an invisible feminine companion at his side.

CUT TO:

46 “HEINRICH'S” LIGHTS—
—enlarging, drawing ahead and racing directly toward us in victory.

DISSOLVE TO:

47 EXTERIOR A WAYSIDE INN—
—idyllic and vine-covered, built from an old water mill. A stream still turns the wheel with a gentle, splashing sound. Within the restaurant a mechanical piano is playing “Goodbye My Dearest Guards Officer.”

“Heinrich” snorts up, and the Comrades get out.

Koster (sniffing): Liver and onions.

Lenz (gently laying his hand on the steaming radiator): I think it's the gear-box.

Koster: Don't forget the drinks.

As they take out the bottles, the Buick they passed pulls up and stops, and the man at the wheel steps out.

Erich Breuer is about forty, a parvenu and a profi­teer. He has modeled himself on the aristocrat, but the veneer is thin and the butcher boy is often in evidence, especially when he is angry or at a disadvantage. He wears a camel's hair coat, a mon­ocle and yellow gloves which he pulls off as he looks angrily at the car that defeated him.

Lenz and Bobby wear superior expressions.

Koster (in a low, warning voice): Great Snakes! We don't want two fights today.

Breuer (addressing them): What kind of a junk is that?

Lenz (coolly, after a moment's pause): Did you say something?

Breuer (testily): I asked what make it was.

Lenz (insolently): Well, the grandpa was a sewing machine, the grandma was an old radio, and the pappa was a machine gun— (he breaks off) From the other side of the Buick there has appeared a lovely girl. Patricia Hollmann is in her middle twenties, stylish and beautiful—and something more. She seems to carry light and music with her—one should almost hear the music of the “Doll Dance” whenever she comes into the scene—and she moves through the chaos of the time with charm and brightness, even when there are only sad things to say.

Seeing her, the Comrades suddenly change their attitude. She smiles and they smile back at her.

Breuer (not knowing what to say): My name's Breuer.

Lenz (introducing): Lenz—Koster—Lohkamp. Why don't you show Mr. Breuer the car, Otto?

Koster (very politely): With pleasure.

Breuer (more pleasantly): I'd like to see it. You wiped me off the map.

Otto Koster and Breuer move toward “Heinrich.” Lenz and Bobby, struck by Pat's beauty, are a little shy.

Bobby: It's a lovely night.

Pat (quite at ease): Gorgeous.

Bobby (embarrassed): Unusually mild.

Lenz (very gravely): Terribly mild.

This doesn't sound quite right to him. He goes to join Koster and Breuer beside the car, leaving Bobby and Pat alone. They take a few steps so that the mill wheel, dripping water, revolves di­rectly behind them. Pat is very slim, very lovely in the uncertain light from the inn; she is an English type, blonde, with silky brown hair, face narrow and pale, cheeks rather wan, long thin hands and big, bright, passionate eyes.

Bobby (admiringly): We didn't know there was anyone so—you know—in the car. Or we'd have let you win.

Pat (her voice is slow, deep, exciting, slightly hoarse): But why should you?

Bobby: It wasn't fair. We can do ninety-five.

Pat (whistles and puts her hands in her pockets): Ninety-five!

Bobby: You couldn't know that, could you? I think Herr Breuer is annoyed.

Pat (shrugs her shoulders): One ought to be able to lose sometimes.

Bobby (after a short pause): Is that your husband you're with?

Pat: No. He's a friend. Are you three brothers?

Bobby (surprised): No. Do we look alike?

Pat: Not exactly— (looking at him) —yet you have the same look—a very proud look.

Bobby (laughs): We run a repair shop.

Herr Breuer comes back enthusiastically into the scene, followed by Lenz and Koster.

Breuer: I don't mind losing now. Mr. Koster has been a speedway racer—won the Grand Prize at Hamburg this year. I'm proud that it was so close. (he laughs—cars are his hobby) Mr. Koster and his friends are supping with us. (he claps Koster on the shoulder) Hey, old man.

DISSOLVE TO:

48 THE INTERIOR OF THE WAYSIDE INN—
—rustic and cozy with a blazing fire. The turning mill is visible through the window, and the rushing stream is audible in the room. The party has fin­ished supper and is drinking wine. There are no other guests. Breuer, a little drunk and very talka­tive, sits beside Koster.

Breuer: Koster, when you take a curve at high speed, do you use the brake or change gears?

Koster: I just turn the wheel.

Breuer laughs as if that were an excellent joke.

Breuer: I drove a cab in the war—a staff car—in Berlin. It was better than the front. (he laughs again. Koster nods tolerantly)

Lenz and Bobby sit on either side of Pat. Bobby stares shyly, admiringly at Pat. Lenz is doing the “Floating Sugar Trick.” (Details appended at end of script)

Lenz: Now—sink! (the floating cube of sugar sinks to the bottom of the cup)

Pat (friendly, not supercilious): Extraordinary!

Lenz: Thank you, Madame. (he looks at her) You know, this is a great event for us.

Pat (surprised): To come here?

Lenz: To meet you. (he looks around) Time has ceased to flow on for a minute—as if we'd stopped in a lovely pool. (he smiles) You see, our lives are not very exciting.

Pat: You seem cheery enough. (looks at Bobby's bruise) And pugnacious.

Lenz: Oh, we're that. We go armed. But when we meet someone like you we take off the armor.

Pat: You mean you're—political?

Lenz: Well—I have my sympathies—but Koster and young Bobby here keep out of it. (more intensely) No—I was speaking of the struggle for existence in this country of ours.

Bobby (afraid this is too grave for such a shining lady): I like the way you dress.

The tension of Lenz's seriousness relaxes.

Pat: My only good costume. I feel very English in it—My mother was English. That's why I'm Patricia.

Bobby: Patricia.

Lenz: Pat. That's a fine name—easy to say. My name's Gottfried. His name is Bobby. (Bobby is a little awed by the familiarity) He only tasted the war—he didn't get boiled very hard—he can still be saved.

Bobby (flustered): What do you mean saved?

Lenz (staring straight ahead): Saved for life— (the radio begins to play “Falling in Love Again.” Lenz remembers something) By Heavens, it's his birthday! Where's the rum? (he reaches for it and fills the glasses)

Pat (to Bobby): How old?

Bobby (ruefully): Thirty.

Pat (with an appraising provocative look): That's a very fine age—thirty.

DISSOLVE TO:

49 EXTERIOR OF THE INN

Under an arbor, Bobby and Pat are walking toward the cars, followed by Koster, Breuer and Lenz. Bobby and Pat are silent—the other three are singing the “Song of the Argonnerwald.” Bobby is carrying Pat's cloak. She looks up at the stars as she puts it on—her lips are slightly open in a smile. They reach the cars.

Bobby (attentive): Do you think Herr Breuer is fit to drive?

Pat: I think so.

Bobby (anxiously): If you're not quite sure, one of us could go with you.

Pat: It's all right. He drives better when he's had a little.

Bobby: But not so surely. (prolonging the moment) Let's hope he'll do all right. Can I phone you in the morning and see if you got home? We're responsible—with that birthday rum.

(the others come up. Breuer gets into the car)

Pat: All right, if you like. Western two seven nine six.

She gets into the Buick. The Comrades bow and wave as the Buick roars away. Bobby notes the phone number on a match packet.

Lenz: I wonder what she finds in that auto catalogue? Wonderful girl, oh?

Bobby (pretending indifference): Who am I to say?

Lenz (teasingly): What do you live for, Bobby?

Bobby (abstracted): I've been asking myself that for a long time.

Lenz (with meaning): Maybe I could tell you.

(he gets into “Heinrich”)

Unobserved, Bobby leans over and pats “Heinrich.”

Bobby (with feeling): Thank you, Heinrich!

FADE OUT

50 FADE IN:

COURTYARD OF THE REPAIR SHOP—
—on a sunny morning. The radio in the office is playing “Tea for Two.” The wrecked Ford is in process of reconstruction. Bobby takes his overalls from the plum tree in the yard, disclosing to his amazement that it has blossomed beautifully during the night. Matilda, broom in hand, stands beside him.

Bobby: Well, look at the old plum tree!

Matilda: Every Spring it's a fresh miracle. And the smell—just like rum— (sniffs) Fine old rum.

Jupp comes up to the tree and picks some blossoms.

Jupp (to Bobby): Good morning.

Bobby (idly): What's the idea?

Jupp: For the ladies. I give them a spray with each gallon of gas. Helps business. (he retires)

Lenz's head appears from beneath the Ford. He lies on a creeper.

Lenz: Say, Bob, it's occurred to me that something ought to be done about that girl of Herr Breuer's.

Bobby (starting): What do you mean?

Lenz: Just that. What are you glaring at me about?

Bobby: I'm not glaring.

(he puts on his overalls)

Lenz (crawling out, covered with grime): You are glaring. What was her name? Pat what?

Bobby (after a pause): How should I know?

Lenz (on his feet): You wrote down her address—I saw you.

Bobby (quickly): On a match packet—and I threw away the packet.

Lenz (seizing him by the hair): Threw it away? After Otto and I spent an hour with Breuer so you could make a hit. Threw it away? Holy Cats! (considers) Maybe Otto knows it.

Bobby: No he doesn't.

Lenz (wrathfully): Of all the blase infants! You twerp, you! Don't you know that was a wonderful girl? (ecstatically) Let me tell you, she was manna from heaven. You didn't have the brains to appreciate her. Did you see those eyes?—of course not—you were looking at yourself in a glass of brandy.

Bobby (picks up a hand pump): Oh, pipe down.

Lenz (tenderly): And her hands—long and slender like Romaine salad—or endives—

Matilda (sweeping in the b.g.): I declare, you make my mouth water.

Lenz: Otto and I understand such things. At last we find a perfect girl—not only beautiful, but with atmosphere— (glaring at Bobby) Do you know what atmosphere is, you low-lifer?

Bobby (working the hand pump): Sure. The stuff that comes out of here.

Lenz (pityingly): Atmosphere is radiance, glamour, warmth, mystery. It is what gives beauty a soul and makes it alive.

He is gesturing passionately. Suddenly he stops, his arms fall to his side.

CUT TO:

51 WHAT HE SEES:

PUPPI, THE INJURED BAKER, AND A TOUGH, DUMPY WOMAN—
—who have come into the courtyard. Puppi wears his arm in a sling. Matilda looks disapprovingly at the woman.

Puppi: Good morning. (he looks at Bobby and Lenz and somehow his haughty manner fails in mid-speech) Isn't my car ready?

Lenz (brought down to earth): Your what? Your car—not quite. That was a terrible beating you gave it. Another three days.

(he turns indifferently to the Ford)

A horn sounds and Koster, in the Cadillac, drives out of the work shop and stops momentarily beside the group.

Koster (to Puppi): How-de-do.

Puppi: Say, I wish you could hurry up my car.

The Woman (looking admiringly at the Cadillac): Is this it?

Koster: No. This one is sold. I'm going to deliver it now. But your Ford will look like new when we're done with it.

Puppi (indicating the wreck to the woman): That one's mine.

Woman (sniffishly): O that. I thought you had a real car.

Lenz is back under the car and Bobby has become absorbed in something he conceals in his hand. Taking advantage of this, Puppi breaks a big sprig from the plum tree, gives it to the woman and grasps her arm to leave. Only Matilda sees and sweeps them out with a haughty flourish of the broom.

CUT TO:

52 WHAT BOBBY IS LOOKING AT:

INSERT:

A BATTERED MATCH PACKET—
—on which is written “Western 2796”. The lines seem to wriggle like snakes or tongues of fire, as if it has been burning his pocket.

53 BOBBY—
—starts at the illusion, then glances carefully at Lenz, and we FOLLOW HIM to the interior of the office. He hesitates, picks up the phone, turns off the radio—just as Lenz begins a terrific banging in the courtyard.

Bobby (lingeringly into the phone): Atmosphere… I beg your pardon. Western two seven nine six.

Bobby waits for the connection with a beatific smile. The banging dies away as we—

CUT TO:

54 A SWITCHBOARD—
—with a white winged angel sitting at it.

Angel (sweetly): One moment, please—I'll connect you with heaven.

CUT TO:

55 THE PEARLY GATES

St. Peter, the caretaker, sitting beside another switchboard.

St. Peter (cackling): I think she's in.

CUT TO:

56 BOBBY'S FACE—
—still ecstatic, changing to human embarrassment as Pat's voice says:

Pat: Hello.

Bobby: Oh, hello. (with an artificial laugh) This is that man.

Pat (calmly): What man?

Bobby (helplessly): That man you met the other night.

Pat (gentle, husky): I've met lots of men—on lots of other nights.

Bobby (frowning): Well—I don't know exactly how to describe myself.

Pat (mischievous): Must you?

Bobby: I'm one of the men who beat you.

Pat (pretending alarm): Really? You must have the wrong woman.

Bobby: In our car, I mean.

Pat (remembering): Oh-h-h. Of course— (with more enthusiasm) —you're the one who was so upset about the state of the nation.

Bobby: No—I was—

Pat: Then you must be the one who sang with Herr Breuer.

Bobby (very apologetic): No. I—

Pat (as if thinking): Was there another—? (she laughs and stops teasing) Of course I remember you.

Bobby (hurriedly): I wondered if you got home all right. Did you?

Pat: Let's see, did I? Why yes, here I am.

Bobby: That's fine. Well— (in wild embarrassment) —goodbye.

Pat: Did you call up to say that?

Bobby: No, we—we just weren't very busy.

Pat (gently ironic): Oh, a compliment. Oddly enough I won't be busy next Tuesday evening.

Bobby (now utterly confused): That is funny. (a forced laugh) Well, goodbye.

Pat: Till Tuesday evening.

Bobby (automatically): Till Tuesday evening. What?

The phone is dead. He wriggles the receiver, and we—

CUT TO:

57 A SATYR, WHO HAS REPLACED THE ANGEL AT THE SWITCHBOARD—
—pulling out the plug with a sardonic expression.

CUT TO:

58 BOBBY—
—frowns, then reconsidering, smiles with satis­faction, and puts the match packet carefully away, as the scene—

DISSOLVES TO:

59 ALFONS' BAR AND RESTAURANT—
—a neighborhood place, plain but with a certain distinction. Some day rich people will “discover” it. Alfons, the proprietor, is not introduced at present, but is in sight behind the bar.

The Comrades are drinking. Bobby wears his best clothes, not very good ones, and is drinking for confidence. Lenz has a strip of adhesive tape on his face.

Lenz (heatedly): The country's mad. Little kids in soldier suits strutting around shrieking that they represent the Fatherland.

Koster: You let it come too near, you, Gottfried. Don't do that. (pause) There's nothing to hold on to right now. Things are rushing along like a stream of water. (to Bobby) What's more important is why Bobby's disguised like a gigolo.

Lenz (feeling Bobby's new tie): A big date, eh? Who is it?

Koster: Why shouldn't he have a date? Go to it, Bob, you're just ripe for love.

Lenz: He has the necessary simplicity.

Koster (defending Bobby): Keep it. It's a gift of God that if you lose, you never get back.

Lenz (cynically): Don't let it get you down, Baby—you can't help being born simple; just don't die simple.

Koster: He's envious, Bobby. He's really the last of the romantics, but he's afraid of the front line. (enthusiastically) Walk into it, Bobby. Remember—Parsifal was stupid—or he wouldn't have won the Holy Grail.

Bobby: Go on—ride me.

Lenz (remorseful): We're not riding you. In bad times, simplicity is priceless. (lightly) A mature mind, mine for instance— (he winks) —sees too many obstacles and gets uncertain before it starts. Knowledge may make you free but it certainly doesn't make you happy.

Koster (raising his glass): Here's to simplicity and all that goes with it, love and faith in the future, the dream of happiness, paradise regained. (he drinks) Bobby, we'll be with you in spirit.

The radio is playing “Falling in Love Again” as we

DISSOLVE TO:

60 THE HALL OF AN APARTMENT HOUSE

(The following scene is an attempt to suggest the feeling of a rather shy young man calling on a girl.): Bobby walks with leaden, slow-motion steps into the elevator. To his alarm, it instantly whisks up­ward with a roar—almost as its gates close they open again to eject him. He casts a reproachful look at the elevator boy. Must he continue? Unseen hands seem to push him from behind, so that he leans backward in protest against the shoving. But the door opens even as he presses the bell and, following a maid, he is shoved like lightning along a hall. The hands seem to leave him, and he stands, limp, inside.

61 PAT'S APARTMENT

—small but furnished with remnants of magnifi­cence. Portraits of generals and courtiers, a soft carpet, cozy little armchairs in faded satin, rolling tea table with tiny sandwiches, cakes and cocktail shaker. A small radio plays a tinkling minuet. Pat is standing to receive him.

Pat (very natural and gracious): How do you do, Mr. Bobby.

Bobby: Well, am I the right man?

Pat (laughing): That remains to be seen. Have a cocktail?

Bobby: Thanks. (as she pours, he looks around) This room is like something in a play.

Pat (offering a tray): Canape?

Bobby (takes one): Thanks. If I drop anything, remember I'm used to eating off of newspapers at the repair shop. I thought you told me you were poor.

Pat: I am. I'm living beyond my means.

They drink.

Bobby: That was good. Felt warm.

Pat (gravely): Then it's a good time to tell you the truth—I've got to leave you by nine o'clock.

Bobby (disappointed) By nine?

Pat: Unfortunately. I only found out about it a few minutes ago, and I didn't know your address. It's a sort of business affair. I'm trying to get a job. (he looks at her cynically) So shall we go right away?

She takes his arm and they go down the hall.

DISSOLVE TO:

62 THE STREET OUTSIDE PAT'S APARTMENT—TWILIGHT

A decayed, once-fashionable quarter. They turn down the street.

Pat (breathing deeply): I'm always so glad coming out that door. There was a time I thought I would never leave that apartment again.

Bobby: How was that?

Pat (evasively): I had to stay in bed. There wasn't so much to eat right after the war, you know. I grew too fast and ate too little.

Bobby: How long were you in bed?

Pat: A year, but it seems a lifetime.

They come to a tea room at the corner of the street.

Bobby (stopping): How about this place?

Pat: It looks a little—stodgy, doesn't it?

Bobby realizes she is used to the best and feels rather miserable.

Bobby: This was probably a mistake.

Pat: What do you mean?

Bobby: I mean I ought to take you—

Pat: Take me where you go.

Bobby: Oh, no! I go to Alfons' bar—but it's rough. No place for a girl like you.

Pat: It's just exactly the place for a girl like me. (looking doubtful, he signals a taxi) I'm really very easily pleased—very superficial and frivolous.

(a taxi stops and they get in.)

CUT TO:

63 INT. OF TAXI

Pat: When I got out of bed, I decided to live as I liked, even if only for a little while.

Bobby: Why not?

Pat: Everyone said I was a fool—that I ought to save my money and go to work. I wanted to be very gay and very irresponsible—and I was.

Bobby (fascinated): I think it was a brave decision.

Pat (remembering): Ach! I was frightened enough some times—as if I was in the wrong seat at the theatre. But it's all over now.

Bobby: When do you go to work?

Pat: In a week. Then I'll be too tired to go out in the evening.

(their eyes meet. It is a challenge, but quiet, almost careless. Bobby responds.)

Bobby: That doesn't leave us much time.

CUT TO:

64 EXTERIOR ALFONS' CAFE

They get out of the taxi.

Bobby (to newsboy at the door): Mr. Koster and Mr. Lenz have left, haven't they?

Newsboy: Oh yes.

Bobby: Good. (to Pat) All right—come on in.

Pat: What's the matter?

Bobby: Two especially tough men I didn't want you to see, that's all.

(they go in)

CUT TO:

65 INTERIOR ALFONS' CAFE

They go through the crowded restaurant where several people salute Bobby. Four tarts at a table start to do likewise but refrain when they see Pat. They exchange winks. Bobby and Pat sit down in an alcove. Alfons, a huge gorilla of a man with sleeves rolled high on hairy arms, approaches them.

Bobby: A double whiskey, Alfons, and something to eat.

Pat (smiling): I'll have a cocktail.

Alfons (he likes Pat): We have Bavarian sausage and sauerkraut, milady.

Bobby (to Pat): All right?

(Pat nods)

Bobby (to Alfons): Fine.

(Alfons goes)

Pat (looking around): I love this place. Do you come here often?

Bobby: It's our headquarters. The only trouble is the (lowers his voice)—choir singing.

Alfons reappears and puts down the drinks.

Alfons (to Pat): Do you like choir singing?

Bobby: We love choir singing.

Bobby downs his drink as Alfons puts a record on the phonograph and a male choir wheezes out “Silence in the Forest.”

Bobby: Another double.

Alfons, helped by a waiter, serves two steaming plates of sausages.

Alfons (to Pat): You look as if you loved good singing.

Pat (playing up): Only choirs.

Alfons (interested): Now that's funny. I do too.

66 EXTERIOR OF ALFONS' CAFE

Lenz and Koster.

Lenz (to newsboy): Seen Mr. Lohkamp tonight?

Newsboy: Yes, sir. He's inside.

Lenz: Oh he is—is he?

Newsboy: He asked if you were inside and when I said no, he went in.

Koster and Lenz exchange a surprised glance and go in.

CUT TO:

67 INTERIOR OF ALFONS' CAFE—BOBBY AND PAT

Bobby (with feeling): I never realized before what a fine place this is.

Pat: It is cozy.

Bobby (lowering his voice): We're in a sort of dugout—shells are screaming overhead but they can't touch us.

Pat (falling into the play): Are you sure?

Bobby: Yes— (he looks at her gravely) I don't know exactly why, but for some reason you and I are safe.

Pat: For the present.

Bobby: That's all you can ever ask in a war.

Pat (curious): Are we in a war?

Bobby: My friends and I have found life to be a war.

Pat (thoughtfully): You are very fond of each other, aren't you?

The voices of Lenz and Koster from out of sight:

Lenz & Koster (o.s.): Why, you two-faced liar, you hypocrite, you low heel! You snake in the grass, you fresh punk, you baby-faced double-crosser!

PAN TO LENZ AND KOSTER, drawing up chairs.

Pat (laughing): Why, hello. Do sit down.

Lenz (icily): We wondered if you got home safely last week, but our friend—: (ironic emphasis on the word): —lost the address.

Bobby: I only had the phone number.

Roster (ignoring him): You got home safely?

Pat (laughs): Herr Breuer knocked over a lamppost but it didn't matter. There are lots more.

Koster: Waiter, some—. What are you drinking? Let's have the same. You see, Pat, we three share everything.

Pat: I hope that includes me— (she looks at her watch) —but only till nine o'clock. I don't want to keep Herr Breuer waiting.

Bobby (suddenly blue): Oh, waiter—another double whiskey. (he looks at his plate and says ruefully) Some delicacies come in very thin slices.

DISSOLVE TO:

68 EXTERIOR PAT'S DOOR

The elevator waits—the boy looks at Pat and Bobby from the cage.

Bobby (rather stiffly): I can't help hoping you won't combine business—with pleasure.

Momentarily surprised, Pat stares at him. Then getting his meaning, she suddenly laughs.

Pat: You baby. Good heavens, what a baby you are!

Bobby (blunderingly): Well, if you—anyway—you think I'm a halfwit.

Pat (gently): No, I don't. (she looks at the elevator boy and points for him to go down) The gentleman can walk.

The elevator boy nods. As he goes down, Pat sud­denly comes into Bobby's arms—a kiss, complete but only one, and she is gone.

DISSOLVE TO:

69 EXTERIOR BOBBY'S BOARDING HOUSE

—a three-story house that has seen better days. Bobby enters.

70 BOBBY ON A FLIGHT OF DREARY, UNCAR­PETED STAIRS

Near the top he suddenly starts back as if at an apparition.

CUT TO:

71 THE STAIR LANDING

Hasse, a poor accountant, a drooping, beaten little man, has run out of his room onto the landing. He is followed by a stream of feminine abuse.

Woman's Voice: —and stay out, you little rat. Us move to a cheaper room! Never! Not on your life! What could be worse than this one? Ach! What a husband!

The door bangs.

Hasse (explaining desolately to Bobby): I want to move only because I'm afraid—I'm afraid. Two more men were fired from the office today—I'll be next, see if I'm not.

Bobby (a little tight): Cheer up, Herr Hasse.

Hasse: I work overtime every night and always these reproaches.

Bobby: You ought to beat her—or else take her to the movies. Take her to a loving movie. Let her dream.

Hasse (bitterly): You're lucky to be alone.

Bobby (seriously): Do you think it's fun to be alone? That's no good either—take it from me.

The sound of a glass breaking within the room. Bobby has an impulse and goes back downstairs.

CUT TO:

72 CORRIDOR BELOW

Several doors are opened suspiciously. From one peeks the head of Frau Zalewska, the landlady.

Frau Zalewska: Good evening, Mr. Lohkamp.

The heads of other boarders peer out as Bobby goes along the lower corridor toward the phone. He takes up the receiver.

Bobby: Western two seven nine six.

The heads regard him. When he looks at one, it disappears, but another pops out across from it, so that his own head jerks from side to side spotting them. There are some coats hanging beside the phone. He makes a sort of tent of them and puts the phone inside.

Bobby: Hello.

Pat's Voice: Oh, hello.

Bobby: Having the business interview?

Pat's Voice: It's all over. I'm on my way to bed—a bit feverish.

Bobby: I'm sorry. (he pushes aside the coats and takes a breath of cool air) You never heard the name Robert before, did you?

Pat's Voice (sleepily): Yes.

Bobby: Let's hear you pronounce it. Say “Robert is terrific”.

Pat's Voice (laughing): Robert is a baby. And I like him that way.

Bobby: Now try “Bob”. “Bob is a—”

Pat's Voice (softly, slowly): Bob drinks too much. Now, I've got to hang up—I've taken a sleeping pill.

Bobby: Goodnight—sleep well.

CUT TO:

73 INTERIOR PAT'S APARTMENT

Pat, full dressed and wide awake, hangs up the phone and stretches out on the couch, smoking. Herr Breuer is lounging familiarly in a chair.

Herr Breuer (irritated): He has his nerve.

Pat: He's just a boy.

(Breuer looks at her narrowly)

Breuer: Your taste seems to be deteriorating.

Pat (pointedly): When one has left one's own world, people are much the same.

(Breuer takes this hard)

Breuer: You haven't answered about the phonograph shop.

Pat: I'd like it. (smiling to herself) I could sell records of choirs.

Breuer (puzzled): What do you mean?

Pat: I was just thinking of something. (her expression changes) But I won't take that ridiculous salary. I'll take a commission, that's all.

Breuer (earnestly): Pat, I want to help you. It'd be a year before a shop would pay you enough to live on.

Pat (carelessly): Then let it go. I'm sorry. I've thought it over, and I don't want anything that way. Pour me some more champagne.

DISSOLVE TO:

74 THE COURTYARD OF THE REPAIR SHOP NEXT MORNING

Seated in the repaired Ford are Puppi, the baker, and his girlfriend. Puppi is counting out money to Koster who stands in overalls beside the car.

Koster: You'll find it's better than ever.

Puppi's Woman (sullenly): That's not saying much. (she nudges Puppi) Ask him about that other car.

Puppi (unwillingly): My fiancee thinks she likes that other car you had—that Cadillac.

Koster: I told you, it's sold and delivered.

Puppi's Woman (very disappointed): That was really a refined car.

Koster (calculating the strength of her desire): Maybe the man who bought it will sell it. We could call him up. (raising his voice) Hey, Bobby! (he looks around) He was here a minute ago.

THE CAMERA MOVES TO SHOW BOBBY, un­seen by the others, asleep in the back seat of the Ford. He has a hangover and his hands press a piece of dirty waste against one side of his head, an oil can against the other.

Puppi (wanting to drop the subject of the Cadillac): Never mind. I'm sure it would be too expensive.

He starts the engine, violently awakening Bobby who, in a nightmare, jumps up and raises the oil can as if to bean Puppi. He recovers himself.

Koster: Bobby, you're a persuasive fellow.

Bobby (yelling—still dazed): What?

Koster: Do you think we could buy back that Cadillac? (he winks) The lady has taken a fancy to it.

Puppi: No she hasn't, really.

Bobby (perking up): Let me try to get back the Cadillac. (to the woman) It certainly would become you better than this.

The woman, beaming, throws her arms around Puppi's neck.

The Woman: Oh, sweetheart.

Koster (thoughtfully): He might sell for seven thousand marks—

Puppi (starts his car rolling slowly): Ach, that would be suicide!

Bobby (running along beside): We'd take this off your hands.

Puppi: Never.

Bobby (sprinting): A car fit for a queen—I'll find out.

As the car passes through the gate, Bobby is stopped sharply by the fence, but his excitement remains.

DISSOLVE TO:

75 INTERIOR OF THE OFFICE

Bobby is hanging up the phone. Koster listening.

Bobby (excitedly to Koster): He'll sell—for six thousand marks. Five hundred more profit for us.

Koster (jubilant): We've got the landlord stopped this month. Rags to riches in a week.

Bobby starts to dance—then groans and sinks down in a chair with his hand on his head. Koster pours himself a drink and offers the bottle to Bobby.

Bobby (shaking his head): I'm fed up with this damned boozing.

Koster: Just as well.

Bobby (after a pause): Say, Otto, you've been all over the world—South America and everything— (he indicates a picture of a beautiful danc­ing Senorita on the phone table) —tell me this. Does a man in love always behave like a sucker?

Koster: Always. (pause) The whole thing is a racket—mother nature's favorite racket. (points out the window) It's like that plum tree—making itself more beautiful than it ever will be again. Love is a swindle—it couldn't be put over on the square.

Bobby: Do people in love always make fools of themselves?

Koster: A man can't make a fool of himself in a woman's eyes by anything he does for her sake. Do anything you like—turn cartwheels for her, dress up like Santa Claus, write her a poem in Chinese, pass out on her doorstep—only one thing to avoid—

Lent (his voice only): Don't—ever—make—sense.

They jump, and the CAMERA MOVES to show Lenz looking in a window.

Bobby (to Lenz): Did you ever take a girl out and get drunk?

Lenz: Often. (looks knowingly at Bobby) Did you act very cute last night? Well, don't apologize. Send flowers. Only flowers. They cover up everything. (with his usual touch of cynicism) Even graves.

DISSOLVE TO:

76 A STREET—BOBBY

standing beside “Heinrich”, looking covetously over a wall at a lilac tree—then stealthily helping himself.

DISSOLVE TO:

77 THE LILAC BRANCH

held in Pat's arm as they roll along the streets of the city. Evening. The lights shining.

Pat (dreamily): Wonderful air. It smells of spring.

Bobby: We can go out into the country. (Pat shivers) Are you cold? (she turns up her collar and tucks her hands in her coat pockets) Your dress is too light.

Pat (shakes her head): I don't like heavy things. It'll be nice when it's really warm this Summer. (he spreads a robe over her lap) Cold makes you miserable.

Bobby (solicitously): Would it make you warm to drive?

Pat: I don't know how.

Bobby (surprised): You can't drive?

Pat (shakes her head): And once we had three cars.

Bobby (looking straight ahead): Herr Breuer might have taught you.

Pat: He likes girls to be helpless.

Bobby (critical): He would.

Pat (dreaming): If I had a car, I'd drive about the streets every evening—half awake, half dreaming. Then one wouldn't need anyone else.

Bobby (thoughtful): You do need someone—in the evening.

Pat: Yes. It's odd—when it turns dark you need someone.

Bobby (moved): Let me teach you to drive.

DISSOLVE TO:

78 THE COUNTRYSIDE—

white with moonlight. The engine off. The shrilling of frogs.

Bobby (practical): —Now, we'll start from the beginning again. First the ignition—a sort of spark—

Pat (with meaning): Everything starts with a spark.

(she starts the car running)

Bobby (indicating the directions): Remember—first speed—second speed—third speed. She goes into first speed. The car moves.

Pat (frightened): Heavens! It's actually going!

Bobby: First speed is the strongest.

Pat: And the safest?

Bobby: Not always. Now, second speed. (a screech as he leans forward; his arm has gone around her) No, always the clutch.

Pat (laughing as his arm presses her): Always the clutch—for all speed.

Bobby: Now third—the fastest.

The car slows up.

Pat (appalled): What have I done?

Bobby: It's in neutral.

Pat: How uninteresting. (with meaning) I don't like neutral.

Bobby (getting it): Neither do I. (he leans toward her but at that moment, before the car quite stops, she gets it in third and they go forward. He cautions her) Not too fast.

Pat: What happens if you're caught?

Bobby: No license. You'd go to jail.

Pat (laughing): The woman pays. Even in a car.

Bobby (sentimental): But even in a car—there's always some place where it's light and warm.

CUT TO:

79 CLOSE SHOT. THE LITTLE AREA AROUND THE DASHBOARD.

Their hands just touching.

DISSOLVE TO:

80 THEIR HANDS OVER A TABLE—
—in Alfons' Cafe, later in the night. Another gay night, with music and a friendly crowd at the tables. Alfons behind the bar and superintending supper.

Bobby (romancing): —then I batted around the world on freighters—especially South America.

Pat: I've always wanted to go to South America.

Bobby (thinking hard): Well, there's Rio de Janiero—and Buenos Aires.

Pat (expectantly): Yes?

Bobby (inventing): You roll down to Rio. It's wonderful. Then—then you roll down to Buenos Aires. They have monkeys—no, they have coffee. Monkeys and coffee.

Pat (mock serious): All rolling around, I suppose. Did you stay there long?

Bobby: Oh yes—years. Mostly in Rio de Jan—

Pat (interrupting): I know—and Buenos Aires. I mean, did you go up the Amazon?

Bobby: There weren't any Amazons. There was mostly coffee—

Pat: And monkeys.

Bobby (fascinated with himself): Yes. Monkeys and coffee. A big harbor and the cities white and high above it, and crocodiles and jaguars and orchids growing in the darkness— (he stops, suddenly ashamed of his roman­tics. The radio is playing) That's a new American tune… it's called “I Can't Give You Anything But Love, Baby.”

Pat: It's sort of sad. Tell me more about South America.

Bobby: Well—

(he takes out Koster's picture of the Sen­orita which he has purloined from the frame in the garage, and hands it across the table; then suddenly he looks up to see Koster and Lenz standing beside them.)

Koster: I'd like to hear about South America, too.

Lenz: At last we know where he is every evening. Hello, Pat.

Koster: Has Bobby told you how he took us with him to South America?

Bobby (very flustered): No, I—

Koster (seeing the picture): Great Snakes! A live Senorita! What do you think of her, Gottfried?

Lenz (examining it): Not bad—her chassis is sprung. Is this the one who sued you for breach of promise, Bobby?

Bobby: Now look here—

Koster: No, that's the one he married. Does she know you're out tonight, Bobby?

Pat, amused, looks fondly at Bobby. Alfons comes up.

Alfons: A round of cocktails on the house—The Three Comrades—always together.

Pat: I'm afraid I'm—extra.

Koster: No, you're not. We welcome you. One and all, we approve of you.

Alfons: And what will you have in honor of this? Some pork chops?

Pat: Divine.

Alfons: Waiter, the chops! (to the group) A wonderful pig—took two firsts.

The waiter sets down a tray of drinks and shows a dish of raw chops.

Koster (gloating): Very promising.

Alfons (raising his glass): Pros't! To the new recruit—now an old soldier.

Smiling, Pat drinks with the Three Comrades.

DISSOLVE TO:

81 INTERIOR ALFONS' CAFE

—several hours later. Alfons is closing up. Pat and the Three Comrades are moving toward the door. False dawn has come up outside, making a blue oblong of the door; through which we see a proces­sion of horse-drawn wagons and dog carts passing. The drivers are chanting a folk song:

“In Einem Kuhlen Grunde”

Bobby, Lenz and Pat: Goodnight, Alfons.

Koster: Good morning, rather. Those are the carts coming into market.

Lenz: Come on—we'll go to the market and buy all the flowers inthe world.

They run for the nearest wagon, one simply over­flowing with piles of cut flowers. Koster and Lenz swing themselves up front with a good-natured peasant.

Koster: Ten marks for a ride in your caravan.

Bobby and Pat get in the rear of the wagon and lie back luxuriantly against the flowers. The tail-board is just high enough to hide them. Lenz, in front, throws a handful of flowers, which arches over the high heap and falls on them.

Bobby: You don't really love me, do you?

Pat (shaking her head): No. Do you love me?

Bobby: No. Lucky, isn't it?

Pat: Very.

Bobby: Then nothing can hurt us.

Pat: Nothing.

Bobby: (puts his arm around her with a passion that belies his words): But you'd better not get lost in here, because I'd never be able to pick you out from the other flowers.

His arm around her—she lies closely to him.

Pat: I'm not this kind of flower. I'm afraid the hothouse variety. (she picks up a blossom and addresses it rather sadly) I'd love to be like you, my dear.

Bobby (holding her close to him; passionately): Oh you are—you are!

They lean far back into the flowers as the song rises to a climax and stops. Then silence, broken only by the sound of the horse's hoofs through the half-darkness.

FADE OUT ON “ACT ONE”

(About the first third of the story)

82 FADE IN ON:

AN EXECUTIVE'S OFFICE—
—modern but not lavish. A map of the city is spread on the desk, and Herr Breuer is marking off with a crayon a district as big as several wards. Beside him stands a tough, brutal looking young man in semi-military garb.

Breuer: —From now on, then, I will be the unofficial mayor of this district. Is that clear?

The Lieutenant: Yes, mein Herr.

Breuer: Anything of importance must be brought immediately to my attention.

The Lieutenant: I understand, mein Herr. From now on the district will be run from this office—by and for our organization.

Breuer: And for Germany.

The Lieutenant (carelessly): Oh yes, and for Germany.

A secretary appears in the doorway.

The Secretary: I have Fraulein Hollmann on the phone, Herr Breuer.

The Lieutenant salutes and departs. Breuer picks up his phone.

Breuer: Hello, Pat. You've been hard to find this week… No, you can explain later…

(he stops smiling) Can I see you tonight?… Then I shall be at the opera myself. Afterwards you and your friend will be my guests for supper.

(he hangs up, frowning)

CUT TO:

83 BREUER'S FACE

—above a white tie he is adjusting in the mirror. A butler is snapping a buckle on his smooth vest.

CUT TO:

84 A LARGE SAFETY PIN—
—on a very gaping vest. This is upon Bobby who is in his room, being valeted by Koster and Lenz. There are open suitcases of clothes on the floor.

Lenz: No—we need that safety pin to keep his tie down at the back.

Koster: I know a way to do that with string.

(he finished pinning the vest and begins on the string)

Bobby: Won't it show?

Lenz: Not as long as you don't take your coat off. That's a point I forgot to tell you. Always keep your coat on in the opera—no matter how you hate the tenor.

(he helps Bobby into his own dress coat, but it is too big)

Koster: Give us the coat.

Lenz: Awful! Try mine. (Lenz's coat is tight but passable) Like a glove.

Bobby: It's tight under my arms. Can't reach my pockets.

Koster: That'll save you a lot of money.

Lenz: It's fine. In that crowd, you won't show.

Bobby (nervously): I wish you were coming.

Lenz: There's just enough clothes for one complete swell. Money?

(he hands some banknotes to Bobby)

Bobby: I've got enough. (he pushes the money away) We may not have a good month so soon again.

Koster (fiercely): I am your superior officer. Anyhow, we're going to race Heinrich next week and make a fortune. (he thrusts the money into Bobby's pocket and speaks seriously) It's quite right what you're doing, Bobby.

Bobby (pretended indifference): I can't figure her out exactly—how she stands with—Herr Breuer.

Koster: Does it worry you?

Bobby (lying): Not a bit.

Koster: It shouldn't. And I envy you.

Bobby: Why?

Koster: Because nothing else is worth a dime. (picking up an opera hat) And this tops you off. (he tries it) The thing won't open. Got a tire wrench?

Lenz: Bang it on something.

Koster tries that—on the electric light, which explodes. But not the hat.

Koster: Never mind, Bobby. Carry it for the effect. It'll open when it sees the other little hats.

(Bobby takes a last look and turns toward the door)

Lenz: And don't forget to—

Koster: Let him alone. You've given him enough advice to last a year.

Bobby winks at them and as a hand organ outside strikes up an old army song, “The Three Lilies,” he goes out at a waiter's trot, carrying the opera hat like a tray on his fingers.

Lenz: Do you think it's wise?

Koster: Yes. It makes me happy that one of us at least has found—

(he hesitates)

Lenz: Found what?

Koster: A window—to look back into the past, into what might have been.

Lenz: You need a drink. Bobby among the rich. I don't quite like it.

Koster: Pat's not rich.

Lenz: She is in her heart. I couldn't go to the opera while there are shootings in the street every night. That's the sound in my ears.

Koster: Then for God's sake, let Bobby have his moment of happi­ness.

DISSOLVE TO:

85 INTERIOR.

A NEW, SNAPPY-TAXI CAB

—SHOOTING FROM the driver's seat at Pat, occupying the backseat alone. She wears a magnif­icent evening dress of silver brocade and sits pic­torially with her arms stretched out to either side of the cab. Bobby is on the little seat with his knee visible and the unopened hat upon it.

Pat: Silly. Come back here.

Bobby: Of course I won't. I might rumple you. You look like a silver torch in this light.

Pat: That's what clothes are for.

Bobby: You need a richer man to match it.

Pat: The rich men I know are pretty awful, Bobby.

Bobby: If you say that often enough, I may got interested.

The hat on his knee suddenly opens with a “Pop!” As Pat laughs, we—

CUT TO:

86 TWO HANDS IN THE DARKNESS—
—lying along the arm of a theatre seat. SHOOT­ING FROM BEHIND, through the interval between the seats, we see them touch and then rise together, back to back. The fingers intertwine and lock.

The curtain of the stage in front of them comes down to end an act of Tales From Hoffman. The music dies away, but the lights have not yet come on. Behind a voice whispers:

The Usher (off scene): Let me see your ticket stubs, please.

Wonderingly, Bobby fumbles for them as the usher repeats the request to the pair at the end of the aisle—a plain German grocer and his fat wife.

Usher: Thank you. I'm sorry, but these seats were sold by mistake. They are reserved for special customers.

The Grocer: What's that now?

Usher: The management requires these seats. You will get your money back at the door.

THE CAMERA PANS to a party of four waiting impatiently in the aisle.

CUT TO:

87 ROW OF SEATS

Bobby (angrily): I won't move from here.

The Grocer: (amid general turning of heads and murmurs of protest): This is an outrage!

The lights go on, showing that one of the party in the aisle is Breuer—very arrogant and uncon­cerned. The other man is a baldheaded oldster. With them are two richly dressed women.

Breuer (to the usher): Hurry them, please. (suddenly he sees Pat and Bobby. Surprised, he changes his tone) Not those two there—they are friends of ours. These.

(he indicates two in front)

The Usher (to the two in front): Let me see your stubs, please.

CUT TO:

88 THE GERMAN GROCER AND HIS WIFE—
—going angrily up the aisle. Following them is another couple, an insignificant man and woman, humiliated and weepy.

The Grocer: Politics—that's it. New bullies in power.

CUT TO:

89 BREUER'S PARTY—
—seating themselves. Breuer leans across Bobby, who is frowning disgustedly, and speaks to Pat.

Breuer: I'm sorry you were accidently disturbed. We'll meet after the performance.

DISSOLVE TO:

90 THE EXTERIOR OF THE THEATRE—
—after the performance. There is a marked contrast between the wealthy opera patrons and the pov­erty-stricken crowd. Breuer's party is walking haughtily to the curb. Pat turns back to speak to Bobby, who has fallen a little behind.

Pat (with sympathy): You're sad, darling.

Bobby: It was such fun—till he came.

Pat: He's just an old friend.

Bobby: That makes it worse.

Pat (gently): Don't be silly.

Breuer (turning around): I'm taking you to a new night club—that will especially interest Pat.

Unwillingly, Bobby gives in as we—

DISSOLVE TO:

91 A NEON SIGN: “TRIANON”

PAN DOWN TO a doorway in what looks like an elaborate private house. Breuer's party is getting out of the limousine.

They stop as Breuer points with his cane to a coat of arms above the doorway. Pat gives a little cry.

Pat: It's our old house. (shocked) A night club!

Breuer: And a great success, I'm told.

Pat recovers from her moment of shock and laughs.

Pat: I suppose I should be proud of that.

CUT TO:

92 THE INTERIOR OF AN INTIMATE NIGHT-CLUB—
—Cossack music—rhumbas and tangos rather than jazz—and a distinguished-looking clientele.

The party sits down—Pat next to Breuer, Bobby between the two other women, thirtyish, rich, and bejeweled, not quite “out of the top drawer.” The waiter takes the order.

Breuer (looking at the menu): Champagne first? This Pol Roget, 1922?

(he looks around inquiringly)

Bobby: Some mineral water for me.

Pat (clapping her hands): Bravo, Bobby.

At her evident interest in Bobby, Breuer's face tightens a little.

Breuer (in a chilly voice): And Appolonaris for—one.

Pat (looks around and shivers slightly): This was the reception room. How often I've leaned over those stairs and watched the dancing down below. (ironically) And now at last I can dance here myself.

Breuer: Will you?

They dance off, Bobby's eyes following. Frau Schmidt, the woman at Bobby's side looks him over lasciviously, wetting her lips.

Frau Schmidt: Are you an old friend of Erich Breuer's?

Bobby: Scarcely.

Frau Schmidt: He's become a man of influence. You saw how quickly he got seats in the theatre.

Bobby (ironically): Yes.

The waiter draws a champagne cork.

Frau Schmidt: He's very fond of Fraulein Hollman. And it's a lucky thing for her. (acidly) These fallen aristocrats. (but rather impressed) To think she used to live here!

93 OUT ON THE FLOOR—
—Pat's cheek touches Breuer's. His arm tightens around the silver dress. He talks in a low, confident voice—sometimes she looks up at him and laughs.

94 BOBBY—
—suddenly holds his glass out to the waiter pouring champagne.

Bobby: Include me.

95 FROM THE DANCE FLOOR—PAT—
—looks at Bobby. She smiles encouragingly. For answer—

96 BOBBY—
—raises the champagne glass to her gravely.

97 PAT—
—opens her eyes as if saying, “Ahhh!” She and Breuer stop dancing and come back to the table.

Pat says her old house makes her dizzy. We'll drink and move on.

As they sit down—

DISSOLVE TO:

98 ANOTHER NIGHT CLUB—
—brighter and noisier. Breuer's party is gathered about a tank of live, swimming trout. A waiter brandishes a fish net.

Breuer: That fat one.

The net goes in, the fish is captured.

Breuer (to Pat): There's one the exact color of your dress.

Pat: Oh, which one?

Bobby: I hope he gets away.

Breuer: He won't. Catch him, there.

(the fish manages to escape. The waiter goes after another)

Breuer (testily): No. I want that one.

Pat (suddenly comparing the fish to herself): I don't. Oh, let it go—let it go!

Bobby (as it escapes again): Poor little silver trout!

Breuer meets Bobby's eye; aware of the symbolism of the episode, Breuer laughs contemptuously.

DISSOLVE TO:

99 THE TABLE—LATER

The trout eaten. Breuer and Pat talking.

Breuer (lightly): There's no reason why the Trianon Cabaret shouldn't become a house again, if you chose.

Bobby overhears this and stands up, facing away and taking a step toward the bar.

Frau Schmidt (a little drunk): Where are you going, handsome?

Bobby: For a drink.

She grabs at his coat-tail—this causes the back of his tie to jerk over his collar, revealing a length of string.

Frau Schmidt: Why, the man's all tied up in knots.

Bobby (politely savage): I think I'd better go home—and get some more string.

Pat (alarmed): I must go too—it's late.

Breuer: That's absurd. It's only one. We haven't started yet.

Bobby (quietly): Can't you see she's tired?

Breuer (dryly): You haven't known Pat as long as I have. She doesn't leave parties early. (raises his eyebrows) Why, my friend, you seem to be having trouble with your shirt.

Bobby looks at him angrily and seems about to blow up.

Breuer (to Pat): This dance?

Pat: I have it with Bobby.

Bobby: Please excuse me. I'm not dancing.

(he bows frigidly, and Pat flinches)

DISSOLVE TO:

100 THE INTERIOR OF THE LIMOUSINE—
—on the way home. Pat half asleep between Breuer and Bobby. Bobby is sullen and silent.

Breuer: Where can I drop you?

Bobby: At the next corner.

Breuer: I'll gladly drive you home.

Bobby (looking out the window): Drop me here at Alfons' Bar, if you please.

Breuer: Can you get in at this hour?

Bobby (ironically): Thanks for your interest. I can get in. (Breuer calls into the speaking tube. Bobby touches Pat's hand) I won't wake her. Goodnight, and thank you.

(but as he shuts the door, she stirs)

Pat (half asleep): Bobby—Bobby—

CUT TO:

101 INT. ALFONS' BAR—BOBBY—
—sitting down with Lenz and Koster. They are surprised.

Koster: Hello—I thought you'd see the sun rise.

Bobby: I won't. Perhaps two other people will.

Koster: That man Breuer?

Bobby: About the worst twerp I ever met. Kicking people out of the theater to get himself a seat.

Koster: Alfons! Give Bobby a triple brandy, whiskey, gin and rum.

Lenz (disappointed): She's a rich man's girl.

Bobby: Let's forget it. Tell me about the race at the speedway. What's the prize?

Koster: Five hundred marks cash. (frowning) Look here—don't quarrel with that girl—she's a thoroughbred.

Lenz (bitterly): She's a rich man's girl. What can Bobby do? If he was an American like we read about, he could go out and get rich over-night. But here—

Koster: Forget it. Very few things will stand inspection at three o'clock in the morning.

Suddenly, Bobby raises his hand angrily and smashes his glass.

Bobby (ashamed): Sorry—I forgot where I was for a moment.

DISSOLVE TO:

102 A DESERTED STREET

Dawn is coming, dull smudges behind the house­tops. Bobby lurches along quite tight, his face pale and miserable. Reaching his house, he leans for a minute against the wall—then starts up the steps and searches for his key. In the dusk he hears a sound. Then he peers and sees a pale, indistinct form, crouching on the steps. It is Pat, still in her gleaming silver dress.

Bobby: Pat! Pat—what are you doing here?

Pat (stirring): I believe I've been asleep.

Bobby: How did you get here?

Pat: I walked, darling.

Bobby: I mean why are you here at all?

Pat: I've been asking myself that for an hour. (she stands up with a little fit of coughing) Oh God, it's cold.

Bobby (sobering): Pat, you're a marvelous girl, and I'm a damned idiot. But you're shivering. Come inside here.

With his arm around her, they go in.

DISSOLVE TO:

103 BOBBY AND PAT—
—entering his room, Pat exhausted from the climb. He puts her on the bed and piles clothes on top of her.

Bobby: Oh, how dumb I am! I should have called you from Alfons'.

Pat (sniffing): Rum—cognac—whiskey—the League of Nations. Darling!

Bobby: I'm sorry.

Pat: Do you sleep on this bed?

Bobby: Yes—Oh, if I'd only known you were here. You're still shivering. (he piles more clothes on) You're the first lovely thing that's ever been in this miserable room.

Pat (sleepily): You're pretty lovely yourself.

He draws up a low stool and sits down beside the bed, leaning against it. Her eyes close.

Pat: You're a drunkard and a darling, and you didn't mean that the other night.

Bobby: Mean what?

Pat: About not loving me.

Bobby (suppressing a desire to put his arms around her): No, I didn't mean it.

She closes her eyes; the birds are twittering outside the window. Bobby leans his elbow on the bed with his arm alongside hers. He yawns—his top hat opens with a dull thud.

DISSOLVE TO:

104 BREUER'S OFFICE—MORNING

A few days later. Breuer at his desk, his lieutenant facing him.

Breuer: Did you make that little investigation?

Lieutenant: I did—the three of them own a sort of repair shop—a poor little place. They pick up old jobs. You couldn't call it a nest of revolutionaries, but one of them is—distinctly dangerous.

Breuer (eagerly): Which one? Robert Lohkamp?

Lieutenant: No. His name is Lenz. The other two don't seem to mix in politics.

Breuer (disappointed): All right. Put this Lenz's name on our list. Where is this garage or shop?

Lieutenant (points it out on the map): There—this corner.

Breuer (with meaning): How very odd! We were thinking of establishing a club house or an armory in that vicinity. It might be just the spot, that corner. I'd like those men moved on.

Lieutenant: Where to?

Breuer: Where—I don't care. (with sudden passion) Out of Germany if necessary.

DISSOLVE TO:

105 A RACE TRACK

An enthusiastic crowd of racing fans.

SHOOTING FROM THE GRANDSTAND ACROSS THE TRACK, we see eight cars pass in a flurry of dust, then CAMERA TRUCKS across track up to—

106 A LINE OF “PITS” ALONG THE BARRIER

Each bears a sign—“Deusenburg,” “Renault,” “Isotta-Fraschini,” “Daimler,” etc. We approach the one marked “Heinrich,” and find Pat, Bobby, and Lenz all very excited, sitting on the barrier. There are cans of oil piled within, and a spare set of tires. Lenz is in mechanics' overalls and holding a bottle of wine.

Lenz (tensely): Otto's gaining—no he isn't. Come on, Heinrich! Good old Heinrich. Last lap!

A Gigantic Mechanic (in the next pit): What is that white junk? A trailer?

Lenz (truculently): Who wants to know?

(the mechanic swells visibly)

Pat (warning him): Don't, Gottfried. Hospitals are expensive.

Lenz and the mechanic are interrupted by a yell of surprise from the crowd.

CUT TO:

107 THE BACKSTRETCH

“HEINRICH” is creeping up on the others.

CUT TO:

108 THE PITS

Lenz: He's stepping on it!

Bobby: Come on, Heinrich!

109 THE HOME STRETCH

The cars tearing for the finish. “Heinrich” and another are neck and neck—“Heinrich” sweeps by—to win.

CUT TO:

110 THE PITS

Lenz (to the big mechanic): Yah! Yah!

Cheering from the crowd. But as the exhaust and dust blow into the pits, Pat has a violent fit of coughing.

Bobby (supporting her): Are you all right?

Pat (choking): Nothing—dust in my throat.

Lenz (excitedly hands her the bottle): Try this!

(he rushes over to where Koster is stepping out of “Heinrich”, surrounded by a crowd)

Pat: I haven't learned to drink from a bottle. (coughing) Isn't it fine we won, darling.

DISSOLVE TO:

111 THE COURTYARD OF THE REPAIR SHOP. LATE AFTERNOON.

The Comrades and Pat at the outdoor table by the plum tree, singing, “Wann die Soldaten Durch die Stadt Marschieren.”

On the table sits the silver cup. “Heinrich” himself, with a wreath on his hood, stands in the back­ground.

Jupp comes up to Lenz.

Jupp: There's a customer—only he doesn't seem like a customer.

Lenz: What? And we haven't anything to sell just now. (he gets up) Where is he?

(he follows Jupp)

Koster: Bobby, would you mind going along too?

Bobby (puzzled): No—but why?

Koster: Lenz might need you. Only for a minute, Bobby.

(Bobby goes—suspiciously)

Pat (touching the cup): Was this worth risking your life for?

Koster (earnestly): I'm going to do something more dangerous than that. Meddle in other people's business. How long have you known Bobby?

Pat: About six weeks.

Koster: Why don't you get married? (Pat starts) You love him, don't you? (she doesn't answer) He hasn't had much out of life. (still she doesn't answer) Think of all you could give him that he's never had.

Pat: It isn't that. it's—oh, it's this wretched body of mine.

Koster: It's an excellent body.

Pat: No—it's merely patched up. After the war, we didn't have enough to eat. I'm no good here.

(she puts her hand on her chest)

Koster: I guessed that.

Pat: I'm all right—when I take care of myself.

Koster: Let Bobby take care of you.

Pat: I wouldn't let anyone do that.

Koster: You little idiot—that's what he needs—something worthwhile to live for. That's what all this idle drinking is about. The world has somehow slipped away from Lenz and me—we don't want it to happen to Bobby.

Pat (shaking her head): It doesn't make sense. Perhaps another kind of woman—

Koster: The kind he couldn't love?

Lenz and Bobby come back to the table.

Lenz (worried): There seems to be some trouble about our license.

Koster: What is it?

Lenz: A fresh little squirt says we'll have to get it renewed. Or rather he said we could try to get it renewed.

Koster (scoffing): What nonsense. We've been here two years. There'll be no difficulty.

Bobby: He said—

Koster: Sit down. You can go to the license bureau tomorrow. (Lenz and Bobby sit down. Bobby next to Pat) This evening is too important to spoil. Pat tells me she loves us all. Am I right, Pat?

Pat: You took the words out of my mouth.

Koster: But I want to resign in favor of Bobby.

Lenz: How about me? Bobby has that South American wife.

Bobby: Shut up, you grease spot.

Koster (pointing to the car): Heinrich is all for it. He's rich now, and he offers to stake them to a week on the coast.

Pat suddenly buries her head in Bobby's chest.

Pat: Darling, let me hide my blushes. You don't want a wife, do you?

Bobby (a little annoyed with Koster): Will you let go my apron strings. Don't you think I can speak for myself?

Pat: Of course you can, darling— (she raises her head) —and let's hear you.

Bobby: Ladies and gentlemen— (he pauses, embarrassed, holding Pat in his arms) —who is this woman?

Pat: Darling— (she looks up at him) —it's just me.

Bobby: Oh.

Pat (looking into his eyes and imitating his tone.): Oh. (he draws her closer. She speaks a little louder and very lovingly) Oh! (then a little muffled as he holds her very closely) Ohh.

Koster and Lenz look at each other and raise their eyebrows reprovingly.

Koster and Lenz (as one would say “Aha”): O-oh!

DISSOLVE TO:

112 THE CORRIDOR OF A MUNICIPAL BUILDING

A row of offices with information desks at intervals. Lenz, frowning, goes along the corridor, and stops at one, speaking to a clerk.

Lenz: My name is Lenz. Who is responsible for renewing business licenses?

Clerk: The License Bureau.

Lenz: There seems to be something funny about it. Our fees are paid, but I can't get the chief clerk's signature, and it's been three days.

Clerk: Not countersigned, perhaps.

Lenz: What's that?

Clerk: Something new. (lowers his voice) Everything now has to be O.K 'd by— (he breaks off suddenly) The Civil Service is down to the left.

Lenz: I didn't ask you—

At the sound of footsteps, he catches the clerk's warning eye. Breuer's Lieutenant passes them, going down the corridor.

Lenz: Oh, politics, eh? Something higher than the law. I wish I knew some of those boys.

His glance falls across the corridor to the door from which the man has issued. THE CAMERA MOVES ALONG WITH HIS EYES to a glass door, on which is lettered: “ERICH BREUER Private Dept. of Appropriations”

Lenz's Voice (excitedly): By heaven! I've met that gentleman.

Clerk: If you know Herr Breuer, it should be easy to arrange. He is not exactly in the administration, but— (he pauses significantly) Lenz has started for the office. He reconsiders and dashes for the pay telephone booth in the corridor.

Lenz: Western two seven nine six.

CUT TO:

113 CORRIDOR. BREUER'S LIEUTENANT

—coming back carrying papers. He pauses at the desk.

Lieutenant: That man who was here—had he just been to the License Bureau?

Clerk: Yes. He's—

Lieutenant (interrupting): Was his name Lenz?

Clerk Yes.

(he points to the phone booth)

The lieutenant nods, smiles and goes on into Breuer's office.

CUT TO:

114 LENZ AT PHONE

Lenz: —but what luck! I remembered that he's a friend of yours. A word from you ought to fix it for us.

CUT TO:

115 PAT AT THE PHONE IN HER ROOM

She has on her hat and is dressed to go out. She frowns a little.

Pat: I'll see him this morning. Goodbye, Gottfried.

She hangs up, puts her face in a bowl of flowers with a card, “Bobby,” beside it, picks up her bag and goes out.

DISSOLVE TO:

116 BREUER'S OFFICE.

Breuer behind his desk. Pat sitting upon it, smoking a cigarette.

Pat: —So you be a good fellow. Just tell all the little boys to let my friends alone.

Breuer (frowning): It's not so simple as all that.

Pat (surprised): What? You've told me often that you were on the inside.

Breuer: Who are these friends of yours?

Pat: You've met them.

Breuer (contemptuously): Garage mechanics. This Bobby Lohkamp is no friend for you. And that Lenz—he's a mischief-maker, a firebrand.

Pat: Gottfried is?

Breuer (savagely): Yes. He's headed for trouble. But the man I'm interested in, or rather you're interested in is Herr Bobby. (his thin veneer of manners cracks) And so I should go to a lot of trouble to help him.

Pat (coolly): Certainly not, Erich. (she gets up) I forgot a lot of things about you for a minute. And thought of you only as a friend. Awfully silly of me.

Breuer: Look here—are you crazy about this fellow?

Pat: Crazy? That's a big word.

Breuer: Have you taken up with him?

Pat: Taken up what? Chess?

(she moves toward the door)

Breuer: You know I'd marry you tomorrow.

Pat: Not if I was married already.

Breuer: My God! Are you?

Pat: If those men were hounded out of their shop I think I'd be married that day.

Breuer (wiping his forehead in relief): But not yet?

Pat: Not—yet.

(she opens the door and goes out)

Breuer (starting after her): Pat!

Angrily ringing a bell, he picks up a small bust of Napoleon from his desk and flings it from him. It just misses the head of his lieutenant coming in.

Lieutenant: You rang, Herr Breuer?

Breuer: I want a close watch kept on these people—a special inves­tigation—day and night—Miss Patricia Hollmann, Otto Koster, Bobby Lohkamp—

DISSOLVE TO:

117 AN AUCTIONEER'S YARD

—full of old junk, furniture, books, etc. In the foreground, under the “AUCTION” sign, a bat­tered old taxi. Its owner, a Jew of about forty, thin and miserable, stands beside the auctioneer. In front of the bidders Pat and Koster sit on old chairs. Bobby and Lenz stand behind them.

Koster (addressing Pat and indicating the taxi): That—if we get it—is going to carry you away on your honeymoon. That's its first job.

Pat: But we're not getting married.

Lenz: I still don't see why they want me along. (he looks at Bobby)

Bobby: Don't look at me—I'm merely the fiancee.

THE CAMERA PANS SIDEWAYS to include a Secretive Little Man with his eyes on our friends. He is Breuer's investigator. Hold it to show that he is straining to hear what they say.

A Voice (from the crowd): Three hundred marks for the taxi.

CUT BACK TO:

118 THE BIDDERS

Koster: Four hundred.

Auctioneer: Come, come. The taxi has its pride.

A bidder: Five hundred.

Koster: Seven-fifty.

Lenz (warning him): Hey, Otto—that's our capital.

Koster: It's a great investment. And look at the poor devil who owns it! It would bring a thousand in better times.

Auctioneer: Seven-fifty—seven-fifty. Sold! This magnificent property to this gentleman.

Koster and the others move forward. The spy melts away into the crowd.

Koster (introducing Pat to the taxi): Your magic carpet.

Pat: Close up the repair shop, Otto, and we'll all go to the beach.

Koster: Impossible. One of us must stay. (CAMERA PANS to include taxi-driver, tears running from his eyes, as he gives his darling a last polish with a piece of waste) Never mind, old fellow. We'll take good care of it.

Taxi Man: It's a fine car. Three years and never a breakdown. But I've been ill— (he straightens his shoulders) I should not complain but thank God for my blessings. (almost with exaltation) Here is one country where a Jew is not homeless—where the Fatherland belongs to him as well as to the others. For that I am proud and happy.

HOLD THE CAMERA on him for a moment to impress the false prophecy of these words then—

FADE OUT.

119 FADE IN ON:

THE OLD TAXI

—chugging along a country road. Bobby at the wheel. Pat beside him; Lenz asleep in the back seat on their piled suitcases.

Bobby (eyes on the road): What does the meter read?

Pat (leaning forward): Nine hundred and eighty marks.

Bobby: I hope you have the money, lady, or I'll have run you straight to the police station.

Pat: Sir, I can't give you anything but love.

Bobby: It won't buy gasoline.

Pat (wickedly): Oh yes it will. They tell me it'll buy trips to the shore—look!

(she points forward eagerly)

SHOOTING FROM THE CAR, we see the road come to a hill-top, dip—and suddenly we are looking down at a wide panorama of beach and sea.

Bobby and Pat (turning excitedly): Gottfried! Gottfried! The sea—the sea!

Lenz (awakening with a start): See what?

DISSOLVE TO:

120 THE BEACH—LATE AFTERNOON

A circular bay, with a distant shore-line. On a hillock, about fifty yards back from the water, stands the Blue-White Inn, a simple little chalet. The beach is quiet; two little tents are pitched near the hull of a wrecked freighter, rotting on the sand.

121 CLOSEUP OF A TRAIL OF FOOTPRINTS

Two pairs parallel in the sand. The sound of a man whistling, and we PULL BACK to show Lenz in an old-fashioned, knee-length, short-sleeved bathing suit, such as were still worn in Germany in 1928. He follows the footprints toward the sea, where they disappear around the corner of the freighter.

Still whistling, he changes his course and walks toward a little bathing tent where two children are playing.

CUT TO:

122 OTHER SIDE OF THE BOAT, LOOKING SHOREWARD

Disclosed are Pat and Bobby leaning against the hull. Pat, wearing a chic bathing suit, is rubbing oil on Bobby's shoulders. A handful of wild ane­mones are scattered in her lap. Bobby, like Lenz, wears a patched old-fashioned costume.

Bobby: Do you think that was Gottfried whistling?

Pat: I don't think. I don't think about anything—except about us and the sun and the holiday and the sea.

(she tickles his nose with an anemone)

Bobby: Take away your rose, woman.

Pat: It isn't a rose.

Bobby: Violet, then.

Pat: Isn't a violet.

Bobby: Then a lily—it better be—those are the only names I know.

Pat: Not really?

Bobby: I've always got by with those three. More oil.

Pat: No more. You just like the rubbing.

Bobby: Lazy mudfish. That's what you were fifty thousand years ago.

Pat: I still am a lazy mudfish. Not a very good play-fellow.

Bobby (fervidly): But an extraordinary sweetheart.

Pat (sighing): Not that either—just a sort of—fragment.

Bobby: A lovely fragment. I'd get very weary if you were perfect. But a lovely fragment—darling. I'll love you forever.

CUT TO:

123 THE LITTLE BATHING TENT

Lenz sitting in the sand, talking to a boy of thirteen and a girl of ten; they have taken an immediate fancy to him.

Lenz: The last time I was at the beach was during the war.

The Girl: Did they fight on the beach?

The Boy: No, you silly.

Lenz: That beach was west of here—in Belgium. We were so glad to be there—we threw off our uniforms and ran into the sea like mad.

The Girl: With your guns?

Lenz (laughing): No, we left them behind. But not far behind, because we'd hear the surf roar, and then every once in a while we'd hear something louder— (he looks off into the distance) —that was the big cannon at the front.

CUT TO:

124 THE BEACH, LOOKING SHOREWARD—

Pat and Bobby, arm in arm, coming down to the sea.

Pat: It looks very cold.

Bobby: It always does. (declaiming as he walks in) But we'll never be cold— (unseen by Bobby, Pat scoops up a handful of water) —as long as we're together—Ouch! Hey!

As the water hits him, he jumps as if a hot wire had touched him.

DISSOLVE TO:

125 LONG SHOT OF THE INN. TWILIGHT—

The faint sound of a motor which grows louder as we—

CUT TO:

126 A PLAQUE:

“GASTHAUS BLAU-WEISS”

DISSOLVE TO:

127 “BLUE-WHITE INN”

MEDIUM SHOT OF THE INN, showing a big Buick stopping in front. Out of it steps Breuer. He pauses to glance at the darkening beach, and then mounts the steps.

CUT TO:

128 THE RECEPTION HALL—
—a clean, middle-class seaside inn, really a board­ing house. Victorian furniture, a porter's desk. Fraulein Muller, the proprietress, a very old gentle­woman, greets him. He clicks his heels and bows in his most important manner.

Fraulein Muller: Good morning.

Breuer: My name is Breuer—have you a room for the night?

She opens a register on the desk.

Fraulein Muller: Our season doesn't start till next week. We only have a few people.

Breuer (signing and scanning the register): I was expecting to meet some friends. Fraulein Hollmann—

Fraulein Muller: Three people came today, but they were in such a hurry to go swimming they haven't registered. There was a single man and a young couple.

Breuer (aghast): What!

Fraulein Muller: I took them for a newly married couple and put their bags in the same room.

Breuer (furious): Impossible. Where are they now?

Fraulein Muller (pointing): Out on the terrace.

DISSOLVE TO:

129 THE TERRACE OF THE INN—TWILIGHT—
—Pat, Bobby and Lenz have finished dinner. Empty coffee cups and glasses. Below the terrace, two strolling musicians with accordion and guitar, are singing “Freut euch des Lebens.”

Breuer comes out of the inn.

Pat (surprised and displeased): Well, hello, Erich. (Breuer kisses her hand coolly) You know Mr. Lenz and Mr. Lohkamp.

They rise and bow. Bobby not very cordially.

Breuer: I've had the pleasure. May I?

(he sits down)

Pat: What are you doing here?

Breuer: I frequently come to the country by myself. It's a surprise to find you here.

Lenz: Have you had dinner?

Breuer: On the road, thank you.

Bobby (dryly, suspecting something): Drive here in your Buick?

Breuer: Yes—did you come here in your—your—

Lenz: We didn't bring Heinrich. It wasn't fair to the rest of the traffic.

Breuer (not knowing his next step): This is a fortunate accident.

Lenz: It was an accident that we first met.

Breuer: Oh yes, the race— (looking at Bobby) —and you won.

Bobby: Yes.

Breuer (carelessly): It was a short distance. (with meaning) Over a longer course I would be quite likely to win.

Bobby (challengingly): We can try it sometime.

Fraulein Muller brings a lamp, sets it on the table and retires.

Breuer: You're staying in the hotel?

Lenz: We're up there somewhere. The end room.

Breuer (with a startled laugh): Not all of you! (as the music roars to a finale) That awful music! Go away, you monkeys!

(he throws some change over the balcony and the music stops)

Lenz (riding him): Maybe there were two rooms—I didn't notice. What's the difference—on the beach all day—just a place to dress and sleep.

Breuer (with a double take): Yes—what? (then trying to smile as he asks Pat lightly) You haven't gone and got married have you?

Lenz: (with the implication that Pat and Bobby didn't worry about a small point like that): No-o-o

(a pause)

Pat (suddenly): Would you wretches mind it terribly if I went to bed? Remember, we've been up since six.

Breuer (disappointed): Oh, I wanted to speak to you— (stops himself) —the next time I saw you—

Pat (interrupting him by getting up): That'll be tomorrow. Goodnight, gentlemen.

(she goes into the inn)

Breuer: Just a minute, Pat. (to the men) You'll excuse me?

CUT TO:

130 THE STAIRS—INSIDE—QUITE DARK—

Pat reaches the first landing. Breuer runs after her.

Breuer: Pat, I must see you alone. I've got something to say—

Pat: It'll have to keep till morning, Erich. (almost pleading) When I say I'm tired, I mean it.

She turns away.

CUT TO:

131 THE TERRACE—

Bobby frowning.

Bobby: So bad news has come.

Lenz (teasing): Give him a chance—he likes Pat as well as you do.

Bobby (impatiently): I'm going to bed.

Lenz: I'll keep an eye on the sea. (As Bobby goes in, Lenz goes to the terrace and calls over to the musicians) Hey, boys! Don't go away.

CUT TO:

132 BOBBY—
—hurrying up the stairs. He goes to Pat's door and knocks.

CUT TO:

133 BREUER'S DOOR—
—which is down the corridor and in half darkness, slowly opening. The strolling musicians have begun to play again outside—a soft, seductive tune.

CUT TO:

134 PAT'S DOOR—
—opening. She takes a step out and is in Bobby's arms. We do not hear what they say but it is a long, passionate goodnight. Presently they break apart and he goes to his room.

CUT TO:

135 INT. BREUER'S BEDROOM. BREUER—
—closing his door and walking across to the win­dow, frowning.

DISSOLVE TO:

136 INT. BREUER'S ROOM—NEXT MORNING

Breuer is taking off his pajama top when his glance falls out the window on the beach.

CUT TO:

137 WHAT HE SEES:

THE ABANDONED FREIGHTER—PAT—sunning herself on a slanting deck. Bobby and Lenz are playing with a medicine ball on the sand. A little farther along are the two children.

CUT TO:

138 BREUER'S ROOM

Breuer reaches for his bathing trunks.

DISSOLVE TO:

139 THE BEACH—BREUER—

In silk bathrobe and beach shoes, approaching the hull cautiously so as not to be seen by Bobby and Lenz. He climbs up the low side of the freighter.

CUT TO:

140 PAT—

Looking up expectantly; changes to a guarded ex­pression as she sees who it is.

Breuer: Is this a private yacht or can I come aboard?

Pat: If you're going where we go. To very pleasant seas.

Breuer: Well—the company is good—at present. Pat, I want you to marry me. I'm really bowled over when I see you with these tramps.

Pat: They've had tough lives to live but they're not tramps.

Breuer (shrugging his shoulders): I was in the war, too. That's the excuse for everything.

Pat: I won't even try to explain them, Erich.

Breuer (tartly): No. Don't. (persuasively) I want you to come back with me today. I want you to marry me tonight. I want to give you everything you once had—

Pat (interrupting): Please, please—I'm so happy now, Erich! For the first time in my life. I don't believe it's going to last very long— (very slowly and intensely) —but while it does, I hate and fear anything that threatens it.

Bobby's face appears on the high side of the deck.

Bobby: Swim, Pat? (he nods to Breuer and pulls himself up on the boat, carrying an inflated innertube) We have a life preserver.

Breuer (supercilious): Doubtless from the garage.

Bobby (glances at Breuer then back at Pat): Swim?

Pat (getting up): Come on.

She starts up the deck toward the high side of the boat. Breuer signs to Bobby to remain behind. Bobby lingers impatiently.

Breuer: I want to talk to you a moment. I understand you've had trouble renewing your license.

Bobby: You know that?

Breuer: A lot of things come to my attention.

Bobby: What has anybody got against us?

Breuer (shrugging his shoulders): Who knows? Perhaps something political—

We have seen Pat disappear over the high side of the deck. Now we

CUT TO:

141 PAT—

Swinging by her hands from the edge of the deck. Only a yard away is a broken stanchion and if she could reach it, she could descend with ease, but her feet can't quite make it. A sea gull swirls near her.

CUT TO:

142 UP ON THE DECK

Breuer: I thought that, whatever the trouble is, I could perhaps make those in charge drop the matter.

Bobby: What are you driving at?

Breuer: I want you to let Pat alone.

Bobby: Oh, so that's it!

CUT TO:

143 PAT—

Struggling and panting. She has given up trying to reach the stanchion and is merely trying to get back up, for the drop is fifteen feet. She cries, “Bobby!” but feebly.

CUT TO:

144 THE BEACH BESIDE THE CHILDREN'S TENT

Lenz looks up, sees her dangling, and starts for her.

CUT TO:

145 THE DECK

Breuer: You claim to be Pat's friend. Well, look at yourself frankly. What have you got to offer Pat? Do you expect her to sew buttons on overalls? (Bobby has no answer—simply looks at Breuer in a dazed way, his thumb through a hole in his bathing suit) As if that would be enough for Pat. (he shakes his head) You're living in a dream, man.

CUT TO:

146 PAT—

Making a last violent struggle, an exhausting strug­gle. She gives a little cry, falls, lands on her hands and knees in the sand. Then she gets up slowly and begins to walk, gasping.

CUT TO:

147 LONG SHOT—LENZ—

Racing toward her in alarm.

CUT TO:

148 PAT—

Staggering, coughing, covering her mouth first with her hand, then with both arms, then falling to her knees, to her face amid the sea weed and wreckage.

Lenz (almost beside her): Pat! Pat!

CUT TO:

149 THE DECK

Bobby and Breuer hear.

Breuer: Something's the matter.

He starts up the deck, Bobby following, still in a daze.

CUT TO:

150 UNDER THE SHADOW OF THE BOAT—MED. SHOT

Lenz is putting a towel under Pat's head. A dark stain is on the towel—Pat is on her back now, but her face is tilted away from the camera. The little boy has just run up.

Lenz (to the boy): Go to the inn—get a doctor!

The boy starts off.

CUT TO:

151 THE EDGE OF THE DECK—SHOOTING UP FROM BEACH

Bobby and Breuer, looking down. Bobby, in wild alarm, swings himself over and drops.

CUT TO:

152 BEACH

Lent (shouting at Bobby): Water—bring water! It's a hemorrhage!

Bobby, aghast, gets his balance, looks around, finds a tin can and runs for the water.

CUT TO:

153 THE PORCH OF THE BOARDING HOUSE

The small boy, panting, meets Fraulein Muller on the porch.

The boy: Get the Doctor. The lady's bleeding—awful.

CUT TO:

154 BOBBY AND LENZ

—kneeling beside Pat—her face invisible, one fist clenched. Bobby pouring the cold water on her throat.

Bobby: Pat! Pat! Oh, God, we can't let her just lie here.

Lenz: You never move a bleeding soldier. (to Breuer who stands by, wearing an expression of horror, slowly changing to distaste) Go get some ice.

(Breuer starts off)

155 SHOOTING OVER PAT'S BODY TO BOBBY

—lying beside her, face to face.

Bobby: Oh, God, make it stop! Oh God, Pat.

The little girl, on her knees, edges a little closer, staring wide-eyed.

DISSOLVE TO:

156 THE SAME SCENE TEN MINUTES LATER—MED. SHOT

(Note: I suggest an absolute avoidance of close shots of Pat. As we can't show the actual horror of the hemorrhage, it is best suggested from the distance of a bystander who cranes his neck to see.): Lenz has borrowed the children's beach tent and is setting it up half over Pat to keep out the sun. Bobby still lies beside Pat, his hand holding her head. The Doctor, an old man, is closing his case. Fraulein Muller and a servant are setting down pails of ice. The children and Breuer stand near, and a dozen curious neighbors have gathered in the background. The Doctor gets up and walks aside to Lenz.

CUT TO:

157 TWO SHOT—DOCTOR AND LENZ

The Doctor: The sun may have brought it on—and getting off the wreck finished it.

Lenz: What now?

The Doctor: She keeps calling for Dr. Jaffé—that's Professor Felix Jaffé—I know him by reputation. If he could be brought here immediately—

Lenz: He will be! I'll phone to the city.

He starts toward the inn. Turning back to Pat, the Doctor encounters Breuer. The latter's expression is even more full of distaste.

Breuer (nervously): I never dreamed she was so ill. Will she die?

The Doctor (brusquely): I can't say.

CUT TO:

158 MEDIUM SHOT—WHERE PAT LIES

Fraulein Muller, with a towel of cracked ice, gently moving Bobby away to set it in place.

Bobby comes up to Breuer and the Doctor, his face wild with grief.

Bobby: Will it start again?

The Doctor: There may be other paroxysms.

Bobby: Isn't there something we can do?

The Doctor: Your friend is trying to get Dr. Jaffé.

Breuer (his interest in Pat has waned): I'll help with any bills, of course. Unfortunately I have to get back to the city this afternoon. (with revolting pleasantness) Forget what I was saying to you—I know you'll be good to Pat. (he nods, turns to the Doctor) Spare no trouble, Doctor. No—

(he catches Bobby's contemptuous eye, bows to the doctor and goes away.)

CUT TO:

159 OFFICE OF THE INN

Lenz at the phone.

Lenz (tensely): —It's a hemorrhage, Otto. Get this now—find Dr.—Felix—Jaffé. He's looked after her and knows the case. Tell him to phone here. Somebody will be waiting. For God's sake, hurry. Otto!

CUT TO:

160 THE OFFICE OF THE REPAIR SHOP

Otto hanging up the phone. Jupp standing by.

Koster: Miss Hollmann's ill. Get out Heinrich right away. Great Snakes!

Jupp rushes out. Koster struggles into his coat and rushes out as we hear the roar of “Heinrich's” engine.

DISSOLVE TO:

161 THE HALL OF THE HOSPITAL—

Koster waiting. A nursing sister comes to him.

Sister: Dr. Jaffé is operating. Do you want to see another Doctor?

Koster: When will he be through?

Sister (hesitantly): Well, he's resting at the moment—but he's about to start a pneumo-thorax—

Koster (interrupting): Sister—he loves this patient—I know he does—and she's dying. I know he'd see me if he understood that.

Sister: Well—

Koster: Where is he?

He takes her arm and hurries her off—she pulls him back just before he marches her into a clothes closet.

Sister (laughing): It's this way.

As they go out.

CUT TO:

162 OUTSIDE THE DOOR OF AN OPERATING ROOM—

The Doctor, stretched on a folding chair, eyes closed. Two internes and a nurse nearby. Dr. Jaffé is a saturnine, bitter-looking old man with the air of hating the world and everyone in it.

Koster and the nurse come in.

Koster (approaching him eagerly): Do you know Patricia Hollmann?

Jaffé (starting—awake): Never heard of her.

Koster (aghast): Patricia Hollmann.

Jaffé: You mean that wretched little devil—that skinny little eye-rolling butterfly—

Koster (sternly and slowly): Patricia Hollmann.

Jaffé: I know her. Don't look at me like that, young man. Where is she—in jail?

Koster: She's had a hemorrhage. They can't stop it.

Jaffé (springing up angrily): And I'm supposed to break off operating to— (he is flinging off his cap and gown) I won't do it! I warned her to take care of herself. She was six months in a sanitarium last year. I told her she'd—where is she?

Koster: She's at— (he hesitates, lies) Not far from here. A little way out of the city.

CUT TO:

163 THE BEACH—LATE AFTERNOON—

Things have quieted down. Present are Pat, the local Doctor, Bobby, Lenz, Fraulein Muller and a trained nurse.

The Doctor (to Lenz after taking her pulse): When will Dr. Jaffé be here?

Lenz: I don't know—two hours, perhaps.

The Doctor: Impossible. A hundred and fifty miles over mountain roads. (he frowns) The wind's getting colder—it's dangerous to leave her here any longer. We'll have to take a chance and move her.

Bobby shrinks as the Doctor signals to two men who stand by with a stretcher.

CUT TO:

164 “HEINRICH” with KOSTER AND JAFFÉ—
—speeding through the city traffic on two wheels—down a one-way street.

DISSOLVE TO:

165 “HEINRICH”—
—tearing into the country.

Jaffé (above the engine's roar): Very much longer?

Koster: Not very much.

Jaffé: How many miles?

Koster (casually): One hundred and fifty.

Jaffé (a double-take): Oh… What?

Koster: But only a few hours.

Jaffé: Stop it! We'll take a train. Why didn't you tell me, you fool?

Koster: You might not have come.

Jaffé: You kidnapper! You know that's a penitentiary offense. You wretched body snatcher… Step on it! (they skid retchingly around a corner) Is she your girl?

Koster: I wish she was.

Jaffé: A reckless, idiotic, self-centered child.

CUT TO:

166 BEDROOM IN THE BLUE-WHITE INN

Pat on the bed, gasping and choking. Bobby, the nurse, and the doctor beside her.

Bobby: Dr. Jaffé's coming, Pat. Any time now. Racing along the road—nearer—nearer—

Pat: I knew it wouldn't last—it was too lovely—I'm sorry to be all this trouble.

Bobby: You should have told me.

Pat (with difficulty): We shouldn't—ever—have met.

(she begins to cough)

The Doctor (to Bobby): She must not be excited.

THE SCENE DISSOLVES TO:

167 A MOUNTAIN ROAD

“Heinrich” tearing along a winding course.

Jaffé: Where did you get this car?

Koster: I built it out of some other cars.

Jaffé: Will you build one for me?

As they dash into a cloud of wind and rain, Jaffé lets go of his hat for an instant. The raging wind blows it off, to bound along the road. Without slowing up, Koster takes off his leather racing helmet and gives it to Jaffé, who looks at it as if it were going to bite him, as we—

DISSOLVE TO:

168 THE PORCH OF THE INN

Bobby standing tensely on the porch beside Frau­lein Muller. Suddenly his face changes.

Bobby: I hear it—I hear it!

Fraulein Muller: I don't hear it.

A purring is now audible.

Bobby: It's like an angel's wings.

He rushes into the house and into—

169 PAT'S BEDROOM

Bobby: Doctor, they're coming! I can hear them!

The Doctor (looking at his watch): It's impossible.

Bobby: There's only one car with that engine. (he runs out): 170 THE PORCH OF THE INN.

Bobby reaches the porch just as “Heinrich” swings around the corner and comes to rest. As Koster and Jaffé step out, the country doctor comes out on the porch of the inn.

The Doctor: Professor Jaffé? (Jaffé nods) Thank God you're here. We have so few cases like this down here.

Jaffé: Where is she?

The Doctor leads the Professor into the cottage.

Bobby (to Koster with feeling): Good work.

Koster: Now stop worrying. Got a cigarette? (Bobby gives him one) How did it happen?

Bobby: Too much exercise—I should have known. If anything happens now—

Koster: Death's no stranger to us, old man. He tried to meet us at the front, didn't he?—but he never quite managed it. Now Jaffé's helping too. It's going to be all right.

The nurse comes out on the steps.

Nurse (to Bobby): Dr. Jaffé sent word to you that she's going to be all right.

She goes in. They look up at a lighted window of the Inn where the shadows of the Doctors move on the blind. Koster claps Bobby on the shoulder.

FADE OUT.

FADE IN:

171 PAT'S BEDROOM. SUNNY AND CHEERFUL.

An old music-box is tinkling “Wann die Soldaten,” and Pat is sitting up, dressed, in an easy chair. She is thin and pale, but her face lights up when Bobby comes in. He lays a bunch of anemones in her lap.

Bobby: Roses, violets and lilies. How are you—very strong?

Pat (proudly): This is the fourth day I've been up.

Bobby (sitting down): Well, there's been some trouble.

Pat: What?

Bobby: Nothing serious—Fraulein Muller stubbed her toe. (bending toward Pat) Darling, you look—

Pat (laughing): Only that?

Bobby: On that new bed?

Pat: What new bed?

Bobby (tantalizing her): One of the guest beds she had to get so quickly. Darling, you look—

Pat (curious) Guest bed? Why?

Bobby (carelessly): Oh, for Lenz and Koster.

Pat (sitting up): Have they come back?

Bobby: They insisted on being here today. Pat, dear—

Pat: (more and more curious): Why?

Bobby: To see it happen, of course. You look—

Pat (wild with curiosity): What happen?

Bobby: Our wedding.

The music box becomes gayer as Lenz and Koster walk in, smiling.

Pat: What is this? Gottfried! Otto! (Lenz and Koster each kiss one of Pat's hands) In the first place, if Bobby and I got married, Herr Breuer would do you an injury.

Koster: No he won't, the twerp. Our license was renewed yesterday. Breuer has withdrawn all opposition.

Pat: In the second place—I'm in no condition—

Lenz: No condition to be left alone. That's what we thought.

(the music-box stops)

Pat: In the third place, Dr. Jaffé said—that I might have to go away—(she falters)—to the mountains—this Fall.

Bobby (with passion): All the more reason to marry me now—(their eyes meet with meaning)—while it's still summer.

Pat covers her eyes with her hand—then looks up smiling mistily. There are tears in Lenz's eyes as he winds the music-box noisily.

Koster: I'll get them. (at the door) All right, Fraulein.

The music-box tinkles out a delicate waltz as if for the wedding of a marionette, as the Burger­meister, Fraulein Muller, two servants and the little boy and girl from the beach come into the room.

FADE OUT.

172 FADE IN ON:

A SMALL YARD OR AREA-WAY—
—in back of a rundown brick house. Afternoon. An old-fashioned cellar door opens, and four men, one of them Lenz, come out cautiously into the yard and proceed toward a gate. As they open the gate, two shots ring out—one of them splinters the gatepost, another knocks off Lenz's hat. The men run—we follow Lenz over a high board fence, and then—

DISSOLVE TO:

173 BOBBY'S ROOM IN HIS BOARDING HOUSE

Koster and Jupp are engaged in putting into place some of the things from Pat's apartment. Matilda, from the garage, is cleaning. As the following scene takes place, they set down a couch, put attractive drapes on tables and bureaus and a fine coverlet on the bed, set up a white lounging chair, hang curtains that are already on rods, transforming—within a short time—a notably bare room into a pleasant and cheerful one.

Koster (setting down his edge of the couch and looking at his watch): I wonder what's keeping Lenz. The newlyweds will be rolling in any minute.

Matilda: Such a difference the lady's furniture makes.

Koster (looking around) Yes. It'll be nice here.

Lenz's Voice (from the doorway): For a while, anyhow. (THE CAMERA PANS TO HIM) For a little while this room will be a little center of warmth and light— (he comes forward into the room) —in a world of hopelessness and despair.

Koster: What's the matter with your hat?

Lenz removes it and regards the bullet hole.

Lenz: A peephole from here to eternity. (he sails it out the door) I oughtn't to bring ill omens here. (he takes a bottle from his pocket) Cognac from Alfons.

Koster: Who shot at you?

Lenz: Oh, I'm fair game. What's known as a dangerous man.

Jupp (at the window): By Golly, they're here!

As he rushes toward the door—

CUT TO:

174 THE OLD TAXI—
—drawing up at the door. Bobby helps out Pat who has been reclining against a mass of pillows. Jupp rushes up, bows, smiles and begins taking out bags.

Bobby: Hello, Jupp. Now, darling, I'm going to carry you upstairs.

CUT TO:

175 BOBBY'S ROOM

Koster tying on an apron and putting the bottle on a tray. Lenz starting “Ubers Meer Gruess Ich Dich Heimatland” on the phonograph.

The door opens, and into the transformed room walks Bobby, carrying Pat in his arms. Koster starts forward clowning—but he can't, and suddenly they are all silent and very moved.

Pat (bravely and with vitality): Hello—Comrades.

Koster (with feeling): Welcome home.

FADE OUT.

176 FADE IN:

A TAXI STAND

Bobby, in the old taxi, pulls up at the end of the row, gets out, lights a cigarette. A big driver gets out of the taxi in front and approaches Bobby.

Taxi Man: Hey, fella, you better get out of here.

Bobby (innocently): Why?

Taxi Man (truculent): You ain't got no cap. We got too many guys already.

Some other taxi men come up.

Bobby (pleasantly): Friend, I haven't taken in five marks all day. That's why I came here. I'll buy some drinks for an entrance fee.

Taxi Man (angrily): We don't want no outsiders. Get going!

Another Driver: Ah, let him alone, Gustav.

Gustav (furious): I'll count three. One—

(Bobby sizes him up)

Bobby (stalling): Wouldn't a whiskey taste good?

Gustav (unbuttoning his coat): —two—

Bobby (losing his temper): Oh, shut your fat face!

Bobby slams him, connects; Gustav goes down and out.

The Other Driver (with admiration): It won't hurt him. He's always asking for it.

They put the man in the cab, and we

DISSOLVE TO:

177 THE INTERIOR OF A CAFE.

BOBBY AND THREE DRIVERS AT TABLE

Bobby: I've been driving in the factory district.

The Friendly Driver: This is a good stand. More money than anywhere else in this rotten city. I'm an actor. Pete here is an architect.

Bobby (smiling): I'm in distinguished company. Is there much work at night?

Architect: Sure—lots of drunks. A taxi-driver's best friend is a drunk.

Gustav comes in, glowering.

Friendly Driver (to Bobby): It's all right. Keep quiet.

Gustav approaches menacingly; suddenly sits down. Bobby pushes a glass toward him.

Bobby (smiling): Your drink.

Gustav gulps it, calls the waiter.

Gustav (gruffly): Same again all round. (to Bobby) Lucky punch.

Bobby: Cracked my thumb.

Gustav: Good.

The waiter appears.

Waiter: Two taxis at the hotel.

Two of the men get up and move out. The phone rings again.

Gustav (raising his glass to Bobby): Good luck, Maxey Schmelling.

Bobby (drinks—puts down his glass suddenly): Excuse me—I forgot something.

(he goes into the phone booth)

CUT TO:

178 DR. JAFFÉ'S EXAMINATION ROOM

Pat sitting up on the table buttoning her waist—Dr. Jaffé writing in a notebook as the phone rings.

Jaffé: I saw you four weeks ago.

Pat: That's right.

Jaffé picks up the phone.

Jaffé (after a moment): Yes, Pat's here now.

CUT TO:

179 BOBBY IN THE CAFE BOOTH

He hangs up, waves at Gustav and rushes out.

DISSOLVE TO:

180 JAFFÉ'S OFFICE

Jaffé and Bobby, standing in the foreground. Pat talking to the secretary by the far door and out of earshot.

Dr. Jaffé (gravely): There has been no change. She must go to a sanitarium in October. A year ago, she seemed so much better. Now—

(he gestures pessimistically)

Bobby (slowly): The world is full of healthy people who ought to be chloro­formed. And this happens to her.

Jaffé: There's no answer to that one. (he puts his hand on Bobby's arm) I ask your pardon for being able to do—nothing.

(they turn toward the door)

Pat (grateful): Goodbye, Dr. Jaffé.

Jaffé (affectionate): Goodbye, my dear.

Pat and Bobby leave the office. CAMERA TRUCKS in front of them down the corridor toward the elevator.

Bobby (unnaturally earnest): You're getting better.

Pat (quickly): Don't. I don't want to know anything—until Autumn. The elevator clangs open.

Elevator Boy (raucously): Down!

DISSOLVE TO:

181 CLOSE SHOT—A CHESTNUT BRANCH

It flutters in a sudden gust of wind—its leaves falling.

CUT TO:

182 A NEWSPAPER—
— blowing along a pavement. ANGLE WIDENS TO SHOW:

183 A SHOPPING STREET—
—on a cold Fall day. Show-windows with fur coats on exaggerated mincing dummies of rich women. Bobby and Pat strolling.

Bobby: If I were rich, I'd buy you a fur coat for Autumn.

Pat (smiling): Which one?

Bobby (pointing): That one.

Pat: You've got good taste. That's Canadian Mink.

Bobby (lightly): Would you like it? I'll give it to you tomorrow.

Pat (without covetousness): Do you know what it costs, darling?

Bobby: Money's no object. I'll sell my yacht.

Pat (alarmed): Our friends would talk.

Bobby: Not another word—you'll have it tomorrow.

184 AT THE NEXT WINDOW—A HABERDASHER—
—exaggerated, comic dummy of a man in dress clothes. In the back of the window is a mechanical display—toy man and woman in evening dress on a circular track. They go in one door of a toy opera house and out the other.

Pat: You've got to have those tails to go with my coat.

Bobby (pulling her back to the first window): But you're not dressed yourself yet. Two or three ball gowns.

Pat (pulling him to the man's window): Shirts, cane, topper—

Bobby (enthusiastically): Where's a jewelers? Where do they sell ship's tickets?

Pat: Egypt—South America.

Bobby (suddenly sobered): There never was any South America.

Pat: I knew it. But darling— (they are walking arm in arm in the crowded street) —it's all right here in our hearts. We can go to the most exciting place—home.

(they come to the taxi parked against the curb. He opens the door and bows. Pat gets in the back seat)

Bobby: Where to, please?

Pat looks at him, shaking her head fondly from side to side. He nods understandingly, gets in and drives off.

DISSOLVE TO:

185 THEIR ROOM

Rain outside. Pat broiling a chop on a gas burner. Bobby on the couch.

Pat (looking out the window): Winter's coming outside.

Bobby (his voice a little frightened): No, not yet. You just think that because it's raining.

Pat (as if to herself): It's raining. It's been raining too long. At night sometimes when I wake, I imagine we're quite buried under all the rain.

Thunder outside. The lights lower—brighten again.

Bobby (with feeling): It seems to me we're lucky. When I think of life as it was before—I thank God. I never thought I would be so lucky.

Pat: It's lovely when you say that. Then I believe it, too. You must say it oftener.

Bobby: Don't I say it often enough?

Pat: No.

Bobby (melting): From now on, I'll tell you every time I feel it. Even though it makes me feel absurd.

A gust of rain against the window. A sudden knock at the door. Bobby answers it to find Frau Zalewska, the landlady.

Zalewska: The phone, Herr Lohkamp.

DISSOLVE TO:

186 DOWNSTAIRS. BOBBY AT THE PHONE.

Bobby: (repeating in amazement a question that has been asked him): “How did she stand the trip?”—What trip?

CUT TO:

186A DR. JAFFÉ'S OFFICE. LATE AFTERNOON

Jaffé: The trip to the sanitarium.

Bobby's Voice (over phone): Why, she's upstairs. I didn't know—

Dr. Jaffé (impatiently): I told her a week ago she must leave. I told her this change of temperature could simply blow her away.

Bobby: She didn't tell me.

Dr. Jaffé: If you want to keep that girl of yours alive you take her off tomorrow—and I mean tomorrow.: Bobby: We'll go tomorrow.

(he hangs up in consternation)

DISSOLVE TO:

187 THEIR ROOM UPSTAIRS

Pat with her face in her hands. Bobby annoyed and tender.

188 FLASH OF CHOP—
—smoking in the pan.

189 THEIR ROOM

Bobby: You should have told me, darling.

Pat: Oh, I couldn't. We've been so happy and it was such a little time. It didn't seem that a week or two could make any difference.

Bobby: We'll have other weeks later. (she looks at him sad-eyed—Bobby resists her firmly) We'll get Frau Zalewska to help pack— (to cheer her) —and listen, Pat, we'll find Lenz and Koster and have a farewell dinner at Alfons'. We'll celebrate.

Pat: (half between tears and laughter): I stole a week anyhow. They can't take that back. I stole a precious, lovely week— (sing-song) Pat stole a wee-eak. (crowing) Now you can put her in prison, but you can't get the week. She's got the loot buried deep in her heart.

DISSOLVE TO:

190 ALFONS' CAFE

A nine o'clock crowd. At a heaping table are Pat, Koster and Bobby—a chair waits for Lenz who has not arrived. Alfons, unusually magnificent in collar, tie and coat, hovers over them.

Pat: It seems awful not to wait for Gottfried but it does look so good.

Koster (to Alfons, rather concerned): Do you know where he is?

Alfons (glancing around cautiously): I have an idea—there's a political meeting.

Koster (to Pat): Anyhow I'll bring him to the train—if he hasn't got a couple of black eyes.

Pat (with feverish gaiety): Alfons, I'm all a dither about how grand you look.

Alfons: In honor of a very fine lady.

Pat: But how can you throw people out dressed like that?

Alfons: Oh, can't I? I'm ready in two seconds. (like lightning he whips off his coat—the shirt front, tie and collar are in one piece and come off with a click. He is ready for action) You see?—if they get tough, I do this—and this—

He picks a little man off a seat at the bar and goes through the action of tossing him out the door. Then setting the little man back on his stool, he replaces his ceremonial front.

Pat: Alfons—

(she pulls his face down to hers and rubs her cheek against him)

Alfons (retiring to the phonograph in embarrassment): It is not done to kiss the maitre d'hotel.

Koster: In front of her husband, too. (he shakes his head) I was afraid it wouldn't last.

Alfons starts the “Pilgrims' Chorus” from Tannhauser.

DISSOLVE TO:

191 THE SAME SCENE. AN HOUR LATER—
—the food eaten. Pat at the bar having cognac with Alfons. Koster and Bobby at the table.

Bobby: We'll have to go home—our train goes at noon.

Koster (low voice): I'm worried about Lenz. Somebody said there's street fighting down in the Schmedgrasse Quarter. And he's always in front of everything.

Bobby: You think we'd better go after him?

Koster: I think we ought to. I hate to drag you out tonight.

Bobby: That's all right.

Koster: You take Pat home and I'll be waiting for you in the street with Heinrich. No use frightening her.

Bobby: I won't tell her.

DISSOLVE TO:

192 THE BEDROOM IN THE BOARDING HOUSE

Pat's trunk and suitcases are in evidence. She is undressed, getting into bed.

Pat: I hope there won't be a bad dream.

Bobby (tenderly): Let me come into your dreams.

Pat: You'd be very welcome there.

Bobby (hesitantly): Pat, I've got a little taxi job—I'll have to go out for a while. A little more money for our trip.

(he bends over her): Pat: I hate it when you drive all night.

Bobby (cheerfully): But I remember you once said you didn't like people watching you when you're asleep.

Pat: I didn't. But now I get frightened that I won't come back.

Bobby: But one always does. I won't let you go away while you sleep. I'm an old wakeful soldier.

(he extinguishes all but the reading lamp and goes out the door)

DISSOLVE TO:

193 THE MISTY STREET OUTSIDE

In the distance a roll of drums, distant shots, the scream of an ambulance. Bobby gets into “Heinrich” beside Koster and they roar away.

DISSOLVE TO:

194 ANOTHER STREET—
—crowded with truck-loads of police with straps, helmets, guns, gleaming in the lamplight. Young men in half uniforms are gathered in the doorways.

“Heinrich” drives through—stops. Bobby and Koster get out and walk to where a speaker is declaiming on an outdoor platform. In the general commotion we can only hear the speaker's voice as it rises to a climax.

Speaker: This cannot go on! This must be changed! (etc. etc.): the audience roars applause. Bobby and Koster jump up on a doorstep and scan the faces of the audience—lower middle-class and proletariat.

Koster: He isn't here—come on. There's another meeting down the street.

DISSOLVE TO:

195 EXT. THE FACADE OF A BIG GRIMY APARTMENT HOUSE

Small stores in front. Two trucks of police waiting. A small crowd listens to a yogi in a turban, preach­ing beneath a sign which reads:

“ASTROLOGY—PALMISTRY—FORTUNE TELLING YOUR HOROSCOPE—1 MARK”

CUT TO:

196 TWO SHOT OF BOBBY AND KOSTER

Bobby: What these people want isn't politics. They want a bogus religion.

Koster: Sure. They want to believe in something again—it doesn't matter what it is. Great Snakes! Look out!

CUT TO:

197 FULL SHOT OF THE STREET—
—along which comes a line of Sturmtruppen—simultaneously a bunch of young men and boys spring from the shadows and plunge a great plank into the door of the apartment house. A fight begins at the door. Some of those within resisting, some pouring out. Chair legs, beer glasses, etc., as weapons.

IN A MEDIUM SHOT, Lenz appears suddenly, grapples with a policeman. Koster grabs the police­man and in a minute, as the police whistles sound, the Comrades are safely out of the melee. They hide—

198 IN A DOORWAY—
— with a crying child, then they step forth and we truck in front of them as they walk down the street, side by side.

Koster (to Lenz): I should think you'd have had enough. After four years of war—

CUT TO:

199 ACROSS THE STREET, FOUR YOUNG MEN—
—stop and regard the Comrades. One of them, wearing new yellow puttees, darts across the street toward them.

Yellow Leggings: There he is!

He fires two shots, turns and tears away, his com­panions with him, as we—

CUT TO:

200 GOTTFRIED LENZ—
—shot through the heart, falls dead on the side­walk.

201 KOSTER AND BOBBY—
—kneel beside Lenz, rip open his coat and shirt. Seeing the wound they stiffen.

Koster (getting up): Stay here—I'll get the car.

(he runs off)

Bobby (shaking Lenz): Gottfried! Can you hear me?

Lenz's eyes are half shut, his face grey. Bobby listens for breathing, for heartbeats. Nothing.

Koster backs “Heinrich” up with a rush beside the body. The street is silent, but there is a far-away burst of machine-gun firing as they pick up the body, lay it in the back seat of the car and cover it with an overcoat. Koster and Bobby get up in front and drive off hurriedly.

Lenz's hand, with one finger outstretched, pro­trudes over the side of the car.

DISSOLVE TO:

202 EXT. FIRST AID STATION. NIGHT.

Bobby and Koster carrying Lenz's body inside.

CUT TO:

203 INT. FIRST AID STATION

A doctor in shirt sleeves showing them where to lay the body.

Doctor: Over here. (he pulls down a light close to the examina­tion table) What is it?

Koster: Revolver shot.

The doctor uses a swab, feels Lenz's pulse, listens to his heart, straightens up.

Doctor: I can't do anything.

Koster: But the shot's over on the side. Maybe it's not so bad.

Doctor: There're two shots. (they all bend over the body) He died right away. (the doctor takes a probing instrument from the cabinet) You can leave him here.

(he works over the body)

Koster (as if starting from sleep): We're taking him with us.

Doctor: Not allowed. I've got to notify the police. We'll have to try to find who did it. Here's one bullet.

(he hands it to Koster who looks at it stupidly a moment)

Koster (slowly getting an idea): I'll drive to the police station.

Doctor: I'll telephone.

Koster (stubbornly): No. I'll go after them.

FOLLOW Koster out the door.

CUT TO:

204 EXT. THE STEPS OF THE FIRST AID STATION

Koster hesitates a minute—then his jaw sets and he goes toward “Heinrich.”

CUT TO:

205 INT. FIRST AID STATION—DOCTOR AND BOBBY

Doctor: Can't you tell me how it happened?

Bobby (cautiously): I don't know. Must have been a mistake for some one else.

Doctor (looking again at Lenz): Was he in the war? (Bobby nods) I thought so from the scars. He was wounded several times.

Bobby: Yes—four times.

Doctor: A rotten trick. (rather guardedly, guessing this is something political) And probably by some skunk who was in his cradle then.

CUT TO:

206 “HEINRICH”—
—pulling up at THE SCENE OF THE MURDER. As Koster gets out, a shabby old woman is passing—by the lamplight she sees the bloodstain on the pavement, starts and walks around it. Koster looks up and down the street—then at the bullet in his hand.

DISSOLVE TO:

207 CLOSEUP OF KOSTER'S FACE IN “HEINRICH”

—driving along a street, looking from left to right, stonily.

CUT TO:

208 INT. FIRST AID STATION

A policeman sitting at a table questioning Bobby. Another stands by.

First Policeman (moistening pencil stub): Your friend's height?

Bobby About— (his voice falters) Five feet ten.

Second Policeman: Can't you tell us roughly what the fellow who shot him looked like? Did he belong to any political party—wear any badge or uniform?

Bobby: I didn't see a badge, but I noticed he had on—

Koster's Voice (o. s.): We couldn't see anything. (he comes in from the street) It was too dark and it happened very quickly. There were the shots and then we only thought— (his eyes fall on Lenz's body) —of our Comrade.

First Policeman: Do you yourself belong to any political party?

Koster: No.

First Policeman (suddenly looking hard at Bobby): But you saw the man.

Bobby (on his guard now): No. I saw nothing either.

Officer: Extraordinary. (he sighs cynically) Then there's not much chance of finding him.

(he bends over his statement)

Koster (indicating Lenz's body): Can we take him with us?

The policemen hesitate.

First Policeman (to Doctor): Cause of death established all right?

Doctor (nodding): I've written the certificate.

First Policeman (to Koster): It's not legal— (he sees the expression of suffering in the faces of the two men) —but if you want to, you can take him home. You understand that there may be a further examination tomorrow.

Koster: Yes.

Doctor (gruffly kind): You can take the stretcher. Bring it back some time tomorrow.

Koster: Thanks.

In silence Koster and Bobby put the body on the stretcher. One of the policemen scratches his head with his pencil—the other yawns sleepily. FOL­LOW THE STRETCHER out to the street.

209 EXT. FIRST AID STATION

Koster and Bobby put the stretcher in the back of “Heinrich” and cover the body with a coat. From the door, the Doctor watches.

210 TRAVELING SHOT—KOSTER AND BOBBY

—very grim as they start off through the thin bitter snow.

Koster: We'll drive along the street just once more.

(Bobby takes a hammer out of a side pocket and lays it beside him): I have the feeling we're going to meet them any minute.

They stop at a cafe on a corner. SHOOTING below its swinging door we see several pairs of legs but none in uniform. Koster opens the door cautiously, peers inside, shakes his head.

DISSOLVE TO:

211 ANOTHER STREET—BOBBY AND KOSTER IN “HEINRICH”

Koster (his eyes narrowing): Look!

CUT TO WHAT HE SEES:

212 GROUP SHOT OF FOUR PEOPLE UP THE STREET

—seen dimly through the snow.

CUT TO:

213 MEDIUM SHOT FROM BEHIND THE GROUP—
— including the four silhouettes against “Heinrich's” approaching headlights.

The headlights go out as the car coasts up and stops with a roar of brakes a few feet away.

CUT TO:

214 KOSTER AND BOBBY—
—getting grimly out of “Heinrich” and approaching—to discover four harmless old people (comedy types) a little drunk. Koster and Bobby stop short.

The Old People (ad lib): I thought he was after me purse! A girl's not safe in her own alley these days! The people you meet in the streets lately! Such wicked faces—scared me half silly!

Without answering, Koster and Bobby get into “Heinrich” and back away.

DISSOLVE TO:

215 “HEINRICH”—
—stopping at a sidewalk. By the light of a dim lamp one sees crossed flags over a doorway—a cardboard sign reads: “CLUB ROOM”.

Bobby and Koster get out.

Koster: Stay by the car. I'll call if I need you.

He rings a bell, knocks at the door. It opens and he walks determinedly inside.

CUT TO:

216 BOBBY—
—lifting the overcoat from Lenz's face so that the snow falls on it. He watches tenderly.

CUT TO:

217 INT. CLUB BUILDING—
—a dark hall. Koster holding a sort of porter or non-com by the shoulders.

Porter (intimidated): I haven't heard any talk about anything.

Koster: You're lying… A man with yellow leggings. (he points to a door at left) What's in there?

Porter: A club room.

Koster (pointing to the other side): What's in there?

Porter: A pistol range. But there's been nobody here for an hour.

CUT TO:

218 EXT. CLUB BUILDINGS

Bobby standing beside “Heinrich.” Lenz's stiffened finger seems to point toward the door of the build­ing as Koster comes out, shaking his head. Bobby covers Lenz's face again. They drive on.

DISSOLVE TO:

219 KOSTER AND BOBBY IN “HEINRICH”

It's just before dawn and they are drenched to the skin. The car comes to a discouraged stop on a narrow street just before it goes into a highway.

Koster: It's no use. They probably got off the streets. (he gets out, goes around and stares at Lenz, adjusting the coat a little as if he were still alive. He speaks as if to Lenz) We've looked everywhere. We won't rest till it's all right.

Bobby (impatient to act): Suppose we go to the police. They could at least help us find him.

Koster (fiercely): We'll settle this ourselves. Do you think I'd let the police take care of it? (passionately) If they found him, I'd swear it was the wrong man so I could get him afterwards. (a clock somewhere begins to strike five in a weird minor. Koster's voice becomes puzzled and bewildered) He wasn't the sort of man you can spare, you know.

There is a crack of thunder and—

THE SCENE DISSOLVES TO:

220 A TRUCKING SHOT. THE SMOKEY REAR AREA OF A BATTLEFIELD IN 1918.

Along a battered communication trench trudge the Three Comrades. Lenz is in the center, giving a helping arm to Koster, who wears a bloody bandage on a head-wound—and to Bobby, who has swal­lowed a mouthful of gas. Bobby gasps and holds his hand to his chest.

Lenz (in a hearty, cajoling voice): Only a little way now. (to Bobby) Come on, son—you'll have a week in bed with pretty nurses chewing on your ear. Won't he, Lieutenant?

Bobby laughs and chokes. Koster stumbles.

Koster: I can't see for this cursed bandage.

Lenz: Nothing to see, Lieutenant—not a lady in sight. Does the Lieutenant think he's at the Kroll Garden? (he sniffs) No gas anyhow—Bobby swallowed it all. Keep moving—I want to get back and blow up the boys that got you.

With a burst of sound that might be gunfire or thunder—

THE SCENE DISSOLVES TO:

221 THE STREET. JUST BEFORE DAWN.

Bobby and Koster looking at each other across Lenz's body. The stiff finger points toward the highway, along which passes a procession of mar­ket carts—but now they are wintry looking and snow-covered. Two of the drivers are singing a melancholy soldier's song, “Argonnerwald.”

Koster: It's morning. (then remembering) You and Pat are leaving at noon.

Bobby: Not now. I can't go with—

Koster (sternly): You're taking Pat to the mountains this morning. When you get back we can settle this.

Bobby (passionately): You swear you'll wait for me?

Koster (nods): I'll wait. This is something we have together.

They stand on either side of Lenz's body as the last market cart clops by and a pale wintry light breaks in the East.

DISSOLVE TO:

222 A RAILROAD TRAIN—
—leaving a grimy city station in the rain.

DISSOLVE TO:

223 A THIRD-CLASS COMPARTMENT. EVENING.

GROUP SHOT favoring Bobby and Pat who stand watching at the corridor door. Some passengers, notably Rita, a Spanish girl, are playing guitar, mandolin and accordion, and others are singing. Several, but not all of them, are thin and pale. Bobby's eyes are far away, expressionless—Pat is smiling.

Pat (to the performers): Bravo, Rita. Hello, Boris.

Rita: Buenas Noches, Pat. (Good Night, Pat)

Boris (a Russian): How do you do, Fraulein Hollmann?

Bobby (in a whisper to Pat): You know these people?

Pat: Yes, from two years ago; they're going to the same sanitarium. All the birds migrate about this time of year.

Bobby (considering): Then it can't be so bad.

As the music starts again they turn from the com­partment and look out the corridor window, elbows on the rail.

Bobby: In the Spring you'll be well enough to come back—all brown with the sun?

Pat (without belief): Yes.

(a strained pause)

Bobby (making conversation): Did you pack your silver dress? (Pat nods) It's a beautiful dress—a dangerous dress. I hope it won't make you unfaithful to me.

Pat (laughs sadly): I love you too much.

Bobby (producing a little flask with a cup on it): We deserve a drink. Pat, you've held up beautifully.

Pat: Not inside.

Bobby: That's why we'll have a drink. (she drinks the cognac) Good?

(Pat nods, leans against his shoulder)

Pat: Oh, darling, what is the good?

Bobby: Keep your chin up—I've been so proud of you all day. (holds her close) It's just the day you leave. Then things get all right again.

Pat: I haven't been brave. You didn't notice. That's all.

Bobby: That's just it. As long as you don't give in, you're bigger than what happens to you. Lenz taught me that.

Pat: Why did he miss the train? (she doesn't know the truth but anything is enough to accentuate her sadness) Oh, Bobby, I'm afraid—afraid of the last great fear. You don't know what fear is.

Bobby: I certainly do.

Voice (off-scene): Tickets, please.

The conductor (a fat comedian) is having difficulty squeezing along the corridor. Bobby hands him the ticket.

Conductor: I've seen the lady's ticket already.

Bobby: Yes—in the sleeper.

Conductor: She must go up there. It's too crowded back here.

Voice (from the compartment—referring to the conductor's girth): It is now.

(laughter within)

Bobby (to the conductor): She came to visit me.

Conductor (puffing, wedged in the doorway): Can't go anywhere without a ticket.

A Voice (within the compartment): That must be your trouble.

Bobby takes Pat's hand and starts down the jerky corridor.

DISSOLVE TO:

224 THE SLEEPER

They enter a compartment with lower and upper both made up. Pat looks at a little slip stuck on the door.

Pat (disappointed): The upper is reserved from Frankfort.

Bobby shuts the door. She lies down in the berth.

Bobby (sitting beside her): It's a good half hour to Frankfort.

Pat (doubtfully): Well, there's that League for Fallen Girls.

Bobby: They don't have branches on trains.

Pat: Are you sure?

Bobby: Very sure.

(he bends toward her)

DISSOLVE TO:

225 THE SAME COMPARTMENT—MORNING

Pat and Helga Guttman, a plain, pleasant-faced girl, sit side by side. They have been chatting while outside the window snowy mountains glide by.

Helga: You were asleep when I came in.

Bobby opens the door and enters.

Bobby: Good morning.

Pat (very bright): Bobby! (indicating Helga) Another old friend—Helga Guttman. She's going back too.

Bobby (bows): Fraulein. (to Pat) How did you sleep?

Pat: Fine. I'm all right now, Bobby. It's good to be going back—to be able to go back. There's tomorrow and next week and next month—why think any farther ahead than that?

As she talks—

DISSOLVE TO:

226 A RAILROAD STATION IN THE MOUNTAINS

Sun, bright snow, a blue sky—happy, laughing people on the platform and the air of a winter resort. Two men in plus fours bear Helga away to a sleigh. Bobby is surprised by the contrast to what he expected.

Helga (waving): So-long, Pat. See you at dinner.

Pat waves back. A porter approaches Bobby.

Porter: What hotel, please?

Bobby: Waldfrieden Sanitarium.

Porter: Waldfrieden Hotel? Will you go by mountain railroad or sleigh?

Bobby: Mountain railroad, eh, Pat?

DISSOLVE TO:

227 A MOUNTAIN RAILROAD OR FUNICULAR

Pat, Bobby and others, including a nurse and a stretcher-patient, are seated in the car which begins to rise slowly up the mountain.

At the top, looking small as a pin-point, is the sanitarium—at the bottom, gradually receding, is the station and the little village.

Bobby: What works it?

Pat: Another car takes on water at the top and pulls this one up. See it?

CUT TO:

228 LONG SHOT—THE OTHER CAR

—beginning its descent of the mountain.

CUT TO:

229 THE ASCENDING CAR

Bobby: Great idea. I wonder who thought of it. Is that the hotel?

CUT TO:

230 LONG SHOT OF THE SANITARIUM AT THE TOP

CUT TO:

231 THE ASCENDING CAR

Pat (looking up and nodding): Hospitals look very beautiful—when you need them.

Bobby (looking down): We're between two worlds. That's our train puffing away—it's hard to believe that I've got to go back to that world this afternoon.

Pat (alarmed): Not right away—you'll stay a week.

Bobby (lightly): Oh no. They'll put you to bed for a while.

Pat (pleading): Two or three days anyhow. (excitedly) Maybe they'll let me stay up.

Bobby (as to a beloved child): You've got fever now.

(he lays his hand on her cheek)

Pat: Your hand is so cool—leave it there. So cool…

A bare branch moves slowly through the car, click­ing against the seats. Pat reaches for it but it is gone.

Bobby (looking straight ahead): Pat, I've got to tell you something now. Gottfried—left us—the other night.

Pat: Left us? (pause) You mean he's dead? (as she realizes) Oh, my God!

Bobby: He was shot—instantly killed.

They stare at each other for a moment. Then slowly her face turns up toward the nearing sanitarium and the white sky behind it.

Pat (in a whisper) Gottfried!

DISSOLVE TO:

232 THE SAME CAR

—descending now, with its seat reversed and the sanitarium receding against a dark sky. Bobby is the only passenger and his face is set and grim. The sound of half-roguish, half martial music begins again as we—

DISSOLVE TO:

233 A LARGE OPEN-AIR CAFE IN THE CITY

Koster and Bobby at a table in a middle-class crowd.

234 IN THE STREET

—a platoon is marching past the open-air cafe—half a dozen officers and non-coms with brutal bullying faces, and their followers—thin-shoul­dered, spectacled clerks; blank-faced country types; thin, pool-room youths and pimply boys in their early teens. The sinister aspect of the personnel is accentuated by the contrast between the tough, remorseless leaders and the sheep-like troops.

THE CAMERA IS HELD ON THEM five or ten seconds to suggest rather than dwell on this.

CUT TO:

235 CLOSEUP—Koster

Koster: God help us if that represents the future.

CUT TO:

236 REVERSE ANGLE—BOBBY

His eyes narrow as he looks across the cafe and gets up quickly. From several angles we show him obstructed by tables or by people coming and going.

This is INTERCUT with LONG SHOTS of another table—a man, seen from behind only, rises and fades into the crowd. Reaching that table to find his quarry fled, Bobby stares about wildly; in a moment, Koster joins him. The music has faded into the distance.

Bobby: It was him—I'd know those leggings anywhere—but he's gone.

Koster: There's no use—we've got to get his name first. We'll try it Alfons' way.

DISSOLVE TO:

237 EXT. POLITICAL CLUBHOUSE

The same that Koster entered on the night of the shooting.

DISSOLVE TO:

238 AN INDOOR PISTOL RANGE

Four young men in semi-uniform are shooting at a line of new board targets. They are: (1) a short, fat, muscular man; (2) a heavy, dark brutish man; (3) a mean-faced “killer” type; (4) a big, fussy moron whose spectacles give him a false air of intellect.

As the fourth man shoots, one of the targets turns sideways with the impact. TRUCK UP TO a grey-haired man in civilian clothes standing near the targets. His expression is covertly interested.

Grey-haired Man: Wait a minute—the target turned.

A flick of his eye shows that he is doing something secretive as he goes to straighten the board.

CUT TO:

239 THE FOUR PISTOL-MEN

Talking and laughing together.

CUT TO:

240 CLOSEUP OF A HAND

Scrawling an initial—“B”, “H”, “T”, and “L”—on each bullet hole.

DISSOLVE TO:

241 THE SAME HAND

Holding four twisted lead bullets in it, each with a tag tied to it. PULL BACK THE CAMERA to show the man with Alfons, Bobby and Koster at a table in Alfons' Cafe. Koster has another spent bullet in his palm.

Koster: This is the bullet that killed him.

Grey-haired Man: An expert can tell which one of these matches your bullet. Then you've got your man.

DISSOLVE TO:

242 EXT. THE POLITICAL CLUB—JUST AFTER SUNSET

The martial-roguish music begins again as the four men who were at pistol practice come out and start down the street.

CUT TO:

243 “HEINRICH”

Half a block behind them and on the other side of the street, getting in motion

CUT TO:

244 THE FOUR MEN

Turning a corner, reaching a cafe. The first man drops out.

The Others: Goodbye, Karl.

CUT TO:

245 “HEINRICH”

Coasting slowly along. Bobby and Koster are dis­cernable in the front seat.

CUT TO:

246 THE THREE REMAINING MEN

Marching jauntily. They pass a couple of street women who make way for them admiringly.

The Women (ad lib): Where to, big boys? Plug 'em where it hurts!

One of the men makes an obscene crack in a low voice—the others laugh boisterously. We are now speculating as to which of the three is the murderer.

CUT TO:

247 CLOSE SHOT OF “HEINRICH”

Bobby and Koster watching intently.

Bobby (warningly): No closer! Slow up! Slow up!

CUT TO:

248 LONG SHOT OF STREET AHEAD

The three men have stopped. They chat and look idly up and down—not noticing “Heinrich.” The second man waves and goes into a house. The music has now ceased.

249 TWO SHOT OF THE LAST COUPLE

—CAMERA TRUCKING AHEAD OF THEM. The choice is now between the “Killer Type” and “Spectacles.” The Killer feels his hip pocket. The other man cleans his ear sketchily with his little finger and looks at it. They do not talk.

CUT TO:

250 “HEINRICH”—
—moving along with only a faint ticking sound through the gathering dusk.

CUT TO:

251 A CORNER

The two men stop. They shake hands and part. We TRUCK AHEAD of the “Killer” type down the street, see him begin to whistle. But it is not he, for we—

CUT TO:

252 THE OTHER STREET

The face of “Spectacles” as he walks along, wearing a faint frown like a premonition. “Heinrich” is just behind him. From a window a radio gives a sudden squawk and the man turns his head as it begins to play “Crazy Rhythm.”

CUT TO:

253 CLOSEUP OF BOBBY AND KOSTER IN “HEINRICH.”

Bobby (grimly to himself): All right, Mister.

Koster: All right, let's go. Let him fire first.

CUT TO:

254 CLOSEUP OF KOSTER'S FOOT

—going down on the accelerator.

CUT TO:

255 “SPECTACLES”
—walking. He reaches the open end of an alley just as—

256 “HEINRICH”—
—rushes up beside the curb.

257 “SPECTACLES”
—starts as Bobby and Koster get out. Then he turns and flees up the alley reaching for his gun.

258 KOSTER AND BOBBY—

Start down the dusky alley, each hugging a wall.

CUT TO:

259 A TRASH BARREL AT THE DEAD END OF THE ALLEY—

From behind which come two crackling flashes.

CUT TO:

260 KOSTER AND BOBBY—

Untouched, continuing on. Two more shots ring out. Then Koster raises his pistol slowly and fires.

CUT TO:

261 THE MURDERER—

Crouched behind a barrel, dropping his pistol and clutching his shoulder. He tries to pick up the revolver with his other hand, but—Koster and Bobby bear down on him.

Koster (fiercely): You killed Gottfried Lenz. Death and hate—that's what you and your kind are peddling through the nation—that's all you know, so here it is—

The murderer leaps to his feet to dodge around the trash barrel. Roster's shots catch him in the heart and stomach, and, clutching himself, he dives head first into the trash barrel.

CUT TO:

262 THE STREET

A policeman approaching hurriedly.

263 THE ALLEY

Windows going up in the gathering darkness.

Voices (ad lib): What's that? Who's there?

CUT TO:

264 THE POLICEMAN—

At the mouth of the alley.

CUT TO:

265 THE MURDERER'S BODY

Half in the trash barrel, legs hanging out. The sound of a loud whistle.

FADE OUT:

FADE IN:

266 A CITY STREET ON A BLEAK WINTRY AFTER­NOON

Bobby's taxi rolling along.

DISSOLVE TO:

267-268 ANOTHER WINTRY STREET WITH THE TAXI—THEN ANOTHER.

DISSOLVE TO:

269 A TAXI STAND—

Bobby swings his arms against the cold, holds his hand up to a prospective customer who doesn't respond—gives up and drives off.

DISSOLVE TO:

270 THE COURT OF THE REPAIR SHOP—
—blear and desolate. No cars except “Heinrich” in the work shop. The taxi rides in, passing the gasoline pump, snow-covered as if it hadn't been used all day.

Bobby gets out at the office door and reads the meter.

CUT TO:

271 CLOSEUP OF THE METER—
—showing one-mark-fifty for the day.

CUT TO:

272 INT. THE OFFICE—

Koster, adding figures at the table, looks up as Bobby comes in the door, but seeing his gloomy face, asks no questions except—

Koster: Cold out?

Bobby (discarding muffler and old leather jacket): Plenty. But nobody rides.

Koster (cheerful): The Christmas rush ought to start about tomorrow.

Bobby: Maybe I'll get Santa Claus for a fare.

Koster pushes a letter over to Bobby.

273 INSERT: PART OF A LETTER:

“…found it advisable to put all our repair work in the hands of several large jobbers, and so are giving up our policy of shopping it around.
Very truly yours,
WIES AUTO-ACCIDENT INSURANCE
Per K.S.R.”

274 INT. OFFICE OF REPAIR SHOP—

Bobby (in a hushed voice): Will we have to go out of business?

Koster (rising and opening a wall locker): Oh no. After Christmas there'll be jobs. Right now every­body's trying to make the old bus last through the holidays. (a knock at the door. Koster, who has just taken out a bottle, puts it back hastily) Come in. (Matilda comes in. She is wrapped in shawls, wears a Queen Mary hat and carries a net bag) Oh—Matilda!

(he takes out the bottle)

Matilda: Good evening, gentlemen.

Koster inverts the bottle over a glass.

Bobby (to Matilda): Got another job?

Matilda: I have several jobs now, thank you, Herr Lohkamp.

(but her eyes are fixed on the more important matter of the bottle—which won't pour)

Koster (rather dismally): Well, that's that. And it's our last drop.

Matilda (taking off her bonnet): My new gentleman orders his rum by the case. (she opens her net bag) He drinks far too much. (she produces a bottle, takes out the cork and sets it on the table) But the very best.

Bobby (with feeling): Matilda—I love you.

(he fills three glasses)

Matilda (haughty in her turn): No customers' rum, that.

(they are really grateful)

Bobby and Koster (raising their glasses): Pros't, Matilda.

(they drink)

They look hungrily at the bottle again but Matilda corks it and puts it back in the handbag.

Matilda: It isn't proper to leave bottles about. (she looks around the room) This room! I declare, I'll sweep it out for you.

She puts on an apron and goes to fetch a broom—during the beginning of the next scene she is in and about, always in the background. Bobby and Koster sit facing each other, smoking.

Bobby (dreamily): A customer will ring up in half a minute—with a big job. You'll see—half a minute.

Koster takes out his watch. Silence, save for Ma­tilda moving about.

Bobby: Half a minute.

Koster: Twenty seconds to go… fifteen seconds—

Bobby: All right, you'll see.

Koster: Four seconds—three seconds—two seconds—one second—

(the phone rings loud and startling. They both spring up, looking at each other in awe. Bobby answers)

Bobby: What?… Oh, hello—yes, yes—a job—yes. (Koster gives a dance kick with excitement and turns to stare at Bobby) …Yes, it sounds fine. What's the price?

Koster (in a stage whisper): For the love of heaven, what is it?

Bobby: Shh! (to the phone) Oh, that's the price.

Koster (wildly): Double it—double it!

Bobby (to Koster): He says I only have to name the price. (to the phone) Would you consider doubling your offer?

(Koster comes toward him in agony, his hands outstretched)

Koster: Great Snakes! Will you tell me what it is?

Bobby waves him silent but he gives a wild yell and collapses on his back on the desk, his feet in the air.

Bobby: Now just repeat that—my partner is not very well.

CUT TO:

275 ALFONS' CAFE—

Alfons on the phone, smiling.

Alfons: You play piano for two hours for these cattlesellers and I'll give you five marks—ten marks—what you want, Bobby.

CUT TO:

276 THE OFFICE—

Bobby hangs up the phone.

Bobby: I'm playing piano for Alfons tonight. Ten marks.

Koster (letting out his breath and sitting up): Oh—h—h—h!

Bobby: If they can stand it. I can. You see, Otto, there is a Santa Claus—

(he breaks off at Koster's expression and follows his glance to the window. A pale face is pressed against the window pane)

Koster: Who's that?

MOVE THE CAMERA UP to show it is the Jewish Driver who formerly owned the taxi-cab. He is poorer and thinner than before.

Koster: Oh, hello—come in.

The face disappears. Bobby opens the door for him.

Koster (cheerful): Come to buy back your taxi?

Driver (laughs): I wish I could. I see you've still got it. How's it running?

Koster: Fine. What are you doing now—driving?

Driver (thoughtfully): No, I'm not driving. I'm doing little jobs here and there. I haven't been able to get a regular job.

Koster: Tough times.

Driver (laughs deprecatingly): There seems to be a little—prejudice around lately. But I must have struck the wrong people.

Koster: There're always some.

Driver (nodding): Yes. Always some. You don't need any work done, do you?

Koster: We're looking for work ourselves. (the cupboard is still open. Koster sees a sweater hanging there) Your clothes aren't very warm. Here—try this on.

Driver (grateful): Thanks. (he admires it) Not depriving you?

Koster (slowly): No. It belonged to a friend of ours. He'd like you to have it.

Driver: I'd be glad to tune up the Ford for nothing.

Bobby: It's tuned to the last pitch.

The sweater has started them thinking of Lenz and, sensing their mood, the driver backs out, wearing it knotted around his neck.

Driver: I'm certainly obliged for the sweater.

Koster: Put it on.

Driver: No, I'll take it home. (Bobby follows him out the door. The Driver pauses affectionately beside the taxi) Well-made car. (Bobby nods. Driver moves off, pauses, reminded of something by the falling snow) I thought I had a job today—but the man wouldn't give it to me— (very quietly; understated) —because it was Christmas.

HOLD THE CAMERA ON his face a moment. Then he wanders away through the snow.

DISSOLVE TO:

277 STREET OUTSIDE ALFONS' CAFE—

FLASH OF THE SEMI-UNIFORMED MEN marching thru the snow to the same mocking mu­sic. Far away an ambulance screams in the night.

DISSOLVE TO:

278 INT. ALFONS' CAFE—

Alfons is looking at the above scene through the window. He turns away with a frown. The cafe is crowded. A twelve-foot silver fir tree stands beside the bar, hung with colored balls, candles and tinsels. Two cafe women are putting on the finishing touches. In the rear, waiters set a big table—silver dishes over spirit lamps hold two suckling pigs with apples in their mouths and little fir sprigs ablaze upon their backs.

Bobby at the piano, is playing American jazz—“Among My Souvenirs,” “Muddy Water,” “Blue Room,” “So Blue,” etc.—and Koster is at a table surrounded by rough well-to-do cattlemen in cow­hide boots. The patrons are moving to the table to sit down.

Now Bobby stops playing, pauses and then leading a quartet beside the piano, begins “O du Frohliche, O du Selige.” Between the second and third verses a waiter comes up to Bobby.

Waiter: A phone call, Bobby. (Bobby nods, not really realizing what the man has said. After the number is finished the man comes back) It's a long distance call for you.

Bobby (jumping up): Why didn't you tell me?

He dashes for the phone booth and another man sits down at the piano and plays, “I Can't Give You Anything but Love Baby,” which continues quietly through the ensuing scene.

CUT TO:

279 THE PHONE BOOTH—

Bobby: Hello. Waldfrieden—yes—

CUT TO:

280 QUICK TRAVELING SHOT OF A LINE OF TELEPHONE POLES IN WINTER—

The line goes up a snowy mountain.

CUT TO:

281 PAT'S ROOM IN THE SANITARIUM—
—bare, white, cheerful. She lies on her bed, half dressed for a party, the silver dress beside her. She is thinner and paler than when we last saw her.

Pat: I tried to call you, dearest—I tried the boarding house and the shop—

Bobby (astonished): My God, are you really there?

Pat: Yes. I'm lying on my bed in my room.

CUT TO:

282 THE PHONE BOOTH

Bobby (groans): Ach, this wretched money! If I had any I'd be in an aeroplane in five minutes.

Pat (sadly): Oh, darling—

Pause—the wire hums.

Bobby: Are you still there, Pat?

CUT TO:

283 PAT'S BEDROOM

Pat: Yes, Bobby, but you mustn't say things like that. You make my nose tingle.

CUT TO:

284 BOBBY IN THE PHONE BOOTH—
—settling himself in the cramped space—head against the wall.

Bobby: Tell me everything you do up there.

CUT TO:

285 PAT'S ROOM

Pat: Well, there're some dances this week.

Bobby: I'll bet you wear the silver dress.

Pat: Yes, Bobby—your silver dress.

Bobby: Who do you go to the dances with?

Pat: No one tonight. It's here in the sanitarium. (pause) This is the last one for me because I have a little operation next week—

CUT TO:

286 THE PHONE BOOTH

Bobby (terribly upset): What is it? Why didn't I know? Is it that one where they cut the rib?

Pat: How did you know?

Bobby: Pat—I want to talk to the Doctor—right away. Don't cut me off—bob the receiver—

DISSOLVE TO:

287 OFFICE OF THE SANITARIUM

Dr. Plauten at telephone.

Dr. Plauten: She had a slight hemorrhage last week and she's run a fever ever since.

CUT TO:

288 THE PHONE BOOTH

Bobby: Is the operation dangerous?

Dr. Plauten: Not if she stays very still afterwards. It's a thoracoplasty—the only danger is a spontaneous collapse of the lung if she should move—

Bobby (interrupting): I'm coming up. It may take me two days—don't do anything till I get there. (he hangs up and hurries from the booth, running into Koster) She's worse. They're operating. I've got to go up there. My heavens, Otto, how can I raise some money?

(Alfons joins them)

Alfons: They want more music, Bobby. I told them to be more generous with the piano player.

Bobby (distraught): Yes, I'll play.

Alfons (noticing his agitation): Rest if you want, Bobby. You've played an hour.

Bobby: I don't want to rest.

He throws himself down at the piano and plays “Kitten on the Keys” or something very staccato.

289 KOSTER—
—looking after Bobby and then silently going to the phone booth and closing the door.

CUT TO:

290 THE TABLE

Men are eating. Christmas stockings being passed by the waiters, containing fruit, nuts, horns, etc.

A Street Woman: And here's the special one for Mr. Bobby. Because lots of times he plays for us for nothing.

She takes it to the piano and hangs it from a song album so that it dangles in front of Bobby whose unseeing eyes stare at it while he plays.

CUT TO:

291 KOSTER IN THE PHONE BOOTH

Koster: Dr. Jaffé, you told me several times that you'd like to buy my racing car. Well, it's for sale now.

CUT TO:

292 HALL OF DR. JAFFÉ'S HOUSE

The Doctor stands at the phone with a table napkin in his hand. SHOOTING PAST HIM, we see his family at dinner in the next room.

Jaffé (incredulous): You mean that preposterous, ugly, rattling hybrid, that mon­strosity, that four-legged road horror, that abominable jug­gernaught?

Koster's Voice (discouraged): Yes. I only thought—

Jaffé (heartily): Of course I'll buy it. I'll drive it the rest of my life and then present it to the Transportation Museum.

Koster (relieved): I'll give it to you in four days. But I need a little advance right now.

Jaffé: Come and get it.

CUT TO:

293 BOBBY—
— playing jazz. Between numbers, the Street Woman is at his ear.

Woman (coyly): Look at your present.

Bobby (not understanding): Present?

(Koster comes to the other side of the piano)

Koster (to Bobby): I've got the money.

Bobby (springing up): Oh, thank God!

Woman (pointing): In the stocking.

Bobby (getting control of himself): Oh—excuse me. (he opens the stocking, pulls out pink socks, a flask of rum, a green tie, half a dozen handkerchiefs) This is—this is—impossible. (he is very touched. They laugh and clap) I don't know when I last got a Christmas present. I don't even remember— (there are tears in his eyes—really the relief from strain) —it must have been before the war. But I have nothing at all for you.

Alfons (his arm about him): Play for us. That's your present.

Bobby turns to the piano and plays “Silent Night” very movingly. The voices join in with beautiful choral harmony as we—

DISSOLVE TO:

294—303 A MONTAGE SHOWING:

“HEINRICH” ON ITS WAY TO THE MOUN­TAINS. THIS SHOULD INCLUDE: WINTER ROADS; STREETS OF COUNTRY TOWNS DOMINATED BY ANCIENT CASTLES; PINE FORESTS AND MOUNTAIN LAKES; NIGHT SCENES—FIXING A FLAT BY MOONLIGHT; SNOW FALLING; FINALLY MOUNTAINS ON ALL SIDES.

CUT TO:

304 TRUCKING SHOT OF KOSTER AND BOBBY IN “HEINRICH.” A SPARKLING MORNING.

Koster (staring ahead triumphantly): We'd never have made it without chains.

CUT TO WHAT HE SEES:

305 A LONG SHOT OF THE INN—
—half a mile away.

CUT TO:

306 LONG SHOT OF A MOUNTAIN ROAD—
—“Heinrich” climbing. A horse-drawn sleigh is parked in the road ahead. “Heinrich” comes to a stop.

CUT TO:

307 CLOSEUP OF PAT ALONE IN THE SLEIGH—
—wrapped in robes and smiling.

CUT TO:

308 MEDIUM SHOT. THE SLEIGH.

Bobby and Koster running up to Pat and embracing her, robes and all, from both sides.

Koster: Great Snakes!

Bobby: We thought you'd be in bed.

Pat: I got your wire. I've been waiting in the road for an hour.

Bobby (to Koster with intensity): Otto, I love Heinrich. I'm grateful to him. I didn't think I'd ever desert him— (quickly) —but I'm getting in here.

He dives in under the robes and comes up from below, holding Pat in his arms.

Pal: Are you staying? Tell me right away.

Bobby: Yes, I'm staying—until we go back together.

As the sleigh turns Pat puts her hand into his chest under the shirt. She kisses him and tears roll down her cheeks.

DISSOLVE TO:

309 EXT. OF THE SANITARIUM

Large chalet style with modernistic touches. People going and coming with skiis, sleds, etc. Bobby helps Pat out of the sleigh as Koster parks “Heinrich.”

Bobby (to Pat): I can't get over everyone looking so gay.

Pat: Do you think it's unnatural?

Bobby: No, but I keep being surprised. How's your friend, Helga?

Pat (stops and faces him): Helga's gone away.

Bobby: Gone away?

Pat (sadly): Yes.

Bobby understands.

Koster joins them, smiling, and they walk into the sanitarium together.

310 INT. SANITARIUM LOBBY—
—spacious and like a hotel save for the nurse at the receiving desk. Lounging chairs and sofas—card tables in use, a radio playing jazz, and a few people drinking what appear to be cocktails in the background. (Some of the types are normal, some thin and feverish but none very sick or emaciated—except when so specified in the script.): As Pat, Bobby and Koster come in, they run into the brisk young Doctor to whom Bobby talked on the phone.

Pat: Dr. Plauten—my husband.

Dr. Plauten (offering his hand): Oh. I'm happy to see you again, Herr Lohkamp. Your wife is a great favorite with us here.

Pat: And Herr Koster.

Bobby: Is she behaving?

Dr. Plauten (lightly): In a way. She is the leader of the younger set. Rather wild you know—cocktails, dancing—

Bobby (worried): Cocktails!

Dr. Plauten: By the dozen.

Pat (ruefully): But they're made of raspberry syrup.

Dr. Plauten (broodingly): Cigarettes—

Pat: Without nicotine.

Dr. Plauten: Coffee—

Pat: Without caffeine.

Dr. Plauten: Dancing—

Pat (looking at Bobby): Without you.

Bobby (shyly): Is it all right for her to dance?

Dr. Plauten: It depends on the fever chart. Would you care to come into my office? I can tell you everything there.

They walk off the scene. Pat's eyes follow Bobby lovingly. Without looking at Koster her arm seeks his.

Pat: Does he love me?

Koster (taking her hand): He loves you, Pat.

Pat (still looking off): Yes, he loves me—terribly. It will be very lonely for him.

Koster: That's silly talk. (they begin to walk in the direction of the bar) What's this about an operation?

CUT TO:

311 THE DOCTOR'S OFFICE. BOBBY AND DR. PLAUTEN.

Dr. Plauten: We take out a piece of the rib here—that's all. She lies still for a few weeks—then she is up again and out—with perhaps a new chance for life—a furlough that may last a long time.

Bobby (terribly depressed): Then she's sinking.

Dr. Plauten: The fever chart hasn't encouraged us. If she'd stayed in the city things would be worse.

Bobby: But you only mean that it goes slower. (shaking his head) You haven't any hope.

Dr. Plauten: A Doctor always has hope. It belongs to his job. But—both lungs are affected. (Bobby shakes his head in silent discour­agement) Miracles do happen. Sometimes it stops, heals up—even desperate cases. (Bobby nods gloomily) We have many patients about the same age. A legacy from the war—undernourishment in the growing years.

As he talks there is a very faint sound of drums in the room. Bobby springs to his feet.

Bobby (wildly): Always that war!

CUT TO:

312 THE “BAR” IN THE LOBBY—
—where what sounded like drums has evolved into “Valencia” on the radio. Koster and Pat are sitting with drinks. Pat reaches around her own cocktail, takes up Koster's and smells it.

Pat: Yours is real—mine is what they call a “Special.”

Koster (absorbed in his thoughts): It's all been absolutely right, Pat. Even if things are as bad as you say, I'm glad you and Bobby have had this happiness together.

Pat: You're very fond of Bobby.

Koster (nods; speaks slowly): Yes. It wasn't on the cards for me to marry and have children. (he drinks) —and I've imagined sometimes he was my son—growing and developing. (sets down his glass) But it was a pretty bleak world to grow up in till you came.

Pat (wistfully): You think I'm what the doctor ordered for him?

Koster (nods): You've given him everything he could have dreamed of.

Pat: It wasn't hard to give him everything. (nervously) But now what do I do? I love him—so I want to know how to act—to leave it all clean and bright just as if I'd never been. (Pat should not lean too heavily on these lines) She smiles suddenly, and CAMERA PANS TO BOBBY, coming out of the Doctor's office. He sees Pat and Koster, bows to Dr. Plauten and goes to­ward them. They meet him near the desk.

Pat: Come and see my room.

Bobby: Otto and I have to get a place to live. (he turns to the motherly woman at the desk) Can you put us up?

Nurse: Out in the lodge. Visitors can't stay in the hospital.

Bobby: I'll bet I can. (the nurse hands him a key which he doesn't take) There's certainly a room next to my wife's.

Nurse: It's absolutely against regulations.

Bobby (to Koster and Pat): You two go along. (As they do, he turns back to the nurse) You have a bee-ootiful face.

(smiling gravely and looking into her eyes)

DISSOLVE TO:

313 PAT'S ROOM

She and Koster stand in the open window. Bobby comes in.

Pat: Success?

Bobby (dissimulating): Absolutely against regulations.

(Pat's face falls)

Koster: We'll think of something.

Pat (sitting on the bed): Tell me about home. Every day we can tell each other a little of what happened while we were apart. Then we can feel we've been together always.

Koster (feeling they want to be alone): There's a rear spring in Heinrich that needs attention.

Pat: Good old Heinrich. What would we do without him? But certainly you're not thinking about going back yet?

Koster (considering): The little operation is day after tomorrow?

Pat (frowns—smiles): That's another day. The important thing is the dance tonight. If I haven't a temperature—I can go.

Koster: Then don't disturb her temperature, Bobby.

(he goes out)

Pat (arms around Bobby): Oh, darling, darling!

Bobby: Ought you to go to the dance?

Pat: No. But I'm going anyhow. (she looks at his serious face) Bobby, all the time you weren't here I did everything they told me. I was nothing but one long prescription. And it hasn't helped. I've only got worse. So the time that I still have—this time with you—let me do as I wish.

(her face is flushed and tender)

Bobby: I only thought we should ask the Doctor first.

Pat: We're asking nobody anything. Nobody. (with an idea) I know where you can borrow evening clothes.

(she pulls him out through the French win­dows onto a little balcony)

CUT TO:

314 MED. SHOT EXT. OF SANITARIUM—BOBBY AND PAT ON HER BALCONY

—including another balcony below them and to the left on which a handsome young Italian, Tony, lies in a deck chair, wrapped in blankets.

Pat: Tony.

(Tony looks up, his face lighting)

Tony: Buon giorno, Pat.

Pat: You once told me you had two dinner coats. Can I wrap up my husband in one tonight?

CUT TO:

315 CLOSEUP PAT AND BOBBY

Pat (whispering): I suppose you've brought your own string?

(Bobby does a “double takem”)

CUT TO:

316 MED. SHOT TO INCLUDE TONY ON HIS BALCONY

Tony: Tutto quello che ho e tuo.

Pat (to Bobby): He says anything he has is yours—isn't he cute? Also you're being introduced—Signor Collazo, my husband.

(the two men smile and wave at each other)

CUT TO:

317 CLOSEUP OF TONY'S FACE

—full of adoration for Pat.

CUT TO:

318 CLOSEUP OF PAT AND BOBBY

—looking out from their balcony.

CUT TO WHAT THEY SEE:

319 THE VALLEY

—rather like Gstaad or Davos in Switzerland, with sanitariums on the snowy peaks. Across from them one road winds upward and disappears like a violet ribbon between the hills.

CUT TO:

320 THE BALCONY

Pat (shading her eyes): Is that the road home?

Bobby: Yes.

Pat: How far is it?

Bobby: About five hundred miles. In May you'll be starting back along that road. Otto and I will come and get you.

Pat: In May. My God, in May!

FADE OUT.

FADE IN:

321 LOBBY OF THE SANITARIUM. EVENING

Radio music. Men and girls in evening dress and heavy coats passing out through the doors into the night. General high spirits.

Pat coming downstairs in the silver dress under a warm coat. Bobby and Koster in dinner coats, are waiting for her, overcoats over their arms.

Bobby (struck by her beauty): Pat, you look—

(he shakes his head, unable to express him­self. Pat nods understandingly)

Pat: You're rather like a Grand Duke yourself. And Otto—well, that's service.

Koster: Ought to be—it's the head waiter's.

They walk through the lobby, stopping to speak briefly to Tony and a party, and Rita the Spanish girl who is between two admirers—Boris the Rus­sian, more emaciated than on the train, and Herr Heffrich, a Dutchman, who looks fat and well. They pass Dr. Plauten who frowns as he sees Pat—he starts to speak to her, hesitates, decides not to.

CUT TO:

322 EXT. THE STEPS ABOVE THE WAITING SLEIGHS

The group pauses to look at the night scene below. Pat's face suddenly wears an abstracted look.

Bobby (noticing an unusual mood): What is it? What are you listening for?

Pat (in a trance): I don't know—I feel as if I were getting ready for something.

Koster (reassuringly): You are—for the ball.

DISSOLVE TO:

323 A LONG SHOT OF THE KURSAL IN THE VALLEY BELOW

Lights blazing, music drifting up faintly, sleighbells jingling.

DISSOLVE TO:

324 THE PARTY IN A SLEIGH—
—swinging along a white road between other sleighs—passing a sleigh with an exchange of gay cries.

DISSOLVE TO:

325 FULL SHOT—THE BALL ROOM AT THE KURSAL, OR CASINO

The orchestra is playing the “Blue Danube” and the guests are doing the old-fashioned “Wiener Waltz.”

Pat has just finished dancing with Tony who bows and retires as Bobby takes over.

Bobby (with exaggerated carelessness as they start off): That's a chap you might fall in love with. Don't you agree?

Pat (innocently): Not exactly. But I don't know how I'd have done without him all the time you were gone.

Bobby: Haven't you ever been tempted here?

Pat: Not very much.

Bobby (torturing himself): Hasn't it been hard to be faithful in that silver dress?

Pat (lightly): On the contrary. It has memories, this dress.

Bobby (ruefully): Yes, I know its effect. But whatever you've done, I don't want to know about it. It's all past and forgotten.

Pat: (undisturbed—whatever she's done, she has no sense of guilt): But I've done nothing. (tenderly) I love you too much.

DISSOLVE TO:

326 A CORNER OF THE KURSAL—LATER—
—with lights playing on the dancers. The orchestra is playing “My Blue Heaven” in “sweet” time. Bobby and Pat are dancing a little apart from the others.

CUT TO:

327 CLOSEUP OF PAT'S LIPS—
—saying something we cannot hear.

CUT TO:

328 REVERSE CLOSEUP OF BOBBY—
—showing his reaction to what she says. Implica­tion of passion in both her whisper and his re­sponse but no words in this scene.

DISSOLVE TO:

329 THE GUESTS AT SUPPER AT LITTLE TABLES

MOVE CAMERA UP TO CORNER OF THE ROOM where Rita sits in the center, playing a guitar—something sad, Slavic and disturbing. At her feet sits Boris the Russian; behind the sofa stands Herr Heffrich the Dutchman. Both look at her adoringly.

At a table right next to this group sit Pat, Bobby and Koster. A girl in front coughs convulsively as the music dies away.

CUT TO:

330 THE GIRL—
—looking quickly into her handkerchief and flinching.

CUT TO:

331 GROUP SHOT FAVORING RITA, BORIS AND THE DUTCHMAN—INCLUDING PAT AND BOBBY

Boris sits up beside Rita on the sofa.

Boris (eagerly): I can dance the next dance with you, Rita. I gained a pound this week.

Rita (sniffing): Only one pound? Heffrich has gained four. (to the Dutchman) Haven't you, dear?

Heffrich (swelling with pride): Not only that—my average afternoon temperature was only one hundred point-one. (Rita eyes him fondly as he turns to Boris) And you're hovering around a hundred and two point-five every day.

Boris (heatedly): That's a lie! He shakes the thermometer down. Everyone knows. (people begin to listen) And I've seen your X-ray chart. (he makes a gesture of revulsion) When you're out of the way, it'll be my turn.

Over the back of the sofa they lunge at each other and in a moment the brawl is raging.

CUT TO:

332 PAT'S TABLE

Bobby (smiling): Is that what you call love by degrees?

Pat (laughing): Love by the pound. You don't know whether to laugh or cry. (looks at Bobby and whispers) Be gay, darling. Be gay tonight for my sake. Who knows when I'll be able to go to a ball again.

A fanfare of drums as we

DISSOLVE TO:

333 THE STAIRS OF THE SANITARIUM—MID­NIGHT

Pat and Bobby walking up together. He has one arm around her and carries her coat. Koster watches them from the foot of the stairs.

334 CLOSE UP OF PAT

As she half turns to say goodnight to Koster.

Pat: It was a lovely dance. Goodnight, Otto.

Bobby and Pat continue to the landing and come to Pat's door.

Bobby (rather shortly): Now you go straight to bed. It's after midnight.

As Pat steps inside her room he stays in the hall and starts to close her door.

Pat (in dismay): Aren't you even going to kiss—

(he shuts the door on her)

CUT TO:

335 PAT'S ROOM

Pat inside the door, rebellious at this treatment.

CUT TO:

336 THE HALL

Bobby hurrying to the next room, unlocking the door with a knowing look.

CUT TO:

337 PAT BEFORE THE MIRROR

—looking at a tear in her dress.

Pat (to herself in a whisper): It doesn't matter. I'll never wear it again.

She looks as if she were listening to something far off. Then she starts, and we see in the mirror that the door between the two rooms is opening and Bobby comes in.

Pat: Oh, Bobby!—where did you come from?

Bobby: My room—next door.

Pat (going toward him joyously): Darling! Old times are here again.

DISSOLVE TO:

338 PAT'S ROOM SEVERAL HOURS LATER.

Pat and Bobby asleep in bed.

CUT TO:

339 CLOSEUP PAT'S FACE—
—showing that she's breathing with difficulty.

CUT TO:

340 TWO SHOT—PAT AND BOBBY

Bobby wakes, immediately concerned. Pat sits up in bed, coughing.

Pat (in a rasping voice): If I can only get through this hour—just this hour, Bobby—then I'll have one day more—it's now that they die.

Bobby: The operation's going to make a new woman of you.

Pat: That's Tony's radio there in the corner. Will you turn it on? (Bobby goes to the radio) Sometimes you can get an American station at this hour—it makes these times pass quicker.

Bobby dials in. After a moment a voice comes on in Spanish.

Voice: Rio de Janeiro broadcasting—a programme of—

Pat (smiling wanly): Oh, Bobby, do you remember—rolling down to Rio?—monkeys and coffee?

Music starts on the radio: it is “My Blue Heaven.” It continues through the following scene.

Pat: You ought not to have slept in this room. Not any more.

Bobby (unperturbed): All right—then. You can sleep in mine.

Pat (dully): And you oughtn't to kiss me.

Bobby (his arm around her): I will kiss you.

Pat (leaning away gently): No, you mustn't get sick. You have to live a long time. I want you to keep well and have children and a real wife.

Bobby: I don't want children or a wife, except you. You are my child and my wife.

Pat (dreaming): I would like to have had a child of yours, Bobby. It must be nice to leave a little of yourself behind. And sometimes when the child would look at you, you'd remember me. And for a moment I'd be there.

Bobby: We'll have a child when you're well—a girl, and we'll call her Pat.

Pat (drinks from a glass of water): Maybe it's better not. You've got to forget me. And if you do think of me, you must only think what good times we had—nothing more. (she sighs) It's over—why—we'll never understand. (shakes her head; speaks almost impersonally) I can't understand it—why two people should love as we do and yet one die.

Bobby (speaking with difficulty): One or the other must die first. But we're a long way from that.

Pat: People should die when they're alone, or when they hate—not when they love.

Bobby (miserable): We could make a better world, couldn't we, dearest?

Pat (nodding): We wouldn't allow things like that. But what we've had couldn't have been better. Only too short.

DISSOLVE TO:

341—350 AN OPERATING ROOM

WE SEE A MONTAGE MADE UP OF THE FOL­LOWING FLASHES:

A DOCTOR'S TROUSERS AND NURSE'S SKIRT UNDER AN OPERATING TABLE—AN INSTRU­MENT TABLE WITH RUBBER GLOVED HANDS PICKING UP INSTRUMENTS—A NURSE'S HAND AND MASK AS SHE OPERATES AN ANESTHETIC MACHINE—UNDER THE OPERATING TABLE AS BEFORE, THIS TIME A CLOSEUP OF THE DOCTOR'S FEET, HEEL LIFTING SLOWLY OFF THE GROUND AS IN A GOLFER'S SWING TO INDICATE THAT HE IS NOW AT THE CULMINATION OF HIS EF­FORT.

A CORRIDOR OUTSIDE—TWO PAIRS OF LEGS (BOBBY'S AND KOSTER'S) WALKING UP AND DOWN TOGETHER—A CIGARETTE DROPS, A FOOT CRUSHES IT, A HAND PICKS UP THE BUTTS. THE FEET WALKING ONE WAY. THE FEET WALKING THE OTHER WAY.

THE OPERATING ROOM, Nurses' and Doctor's feet walking away from the table, instruments being thrown into a steam boiler.

CUT TO:

THE TABLE—being wheeled back through the building into an elevator, out again.

DISSOLVE TO:

351 INT. BOBBY'S ROOM

Bobby pacing. Koster coming in the door from the hall.

Koster: Perfectly normal. Never was any danger and there won't be, if she stays perfectly quiet.

Bobby: Can't I even see her?

Koster: Certainly. I've even got permission to say goodbye before I start.

DISSOLVE TO:

352 PAT'S ROOM—
—darkened. The door to Bobby's room is open and Bobby and Koster are standing beside Pat who lies in bed.

Koster (to Pat): Don't you try to say goodbye—you save your strength for this husband of yours. Half an hour ago he was a lot sicker than you. (Pat presses his hand and smiles from one to the other) Goodbye for a little while—Comrade.

FOLLOW Bobby and Koster into the other room. They close the door behind them.

CUT TO:

353 A CURTAIN

—blowing in at the window with a sudden draft.

CUT TO:

354 THE CONNECTING DOOR

—which they had thought shut, blowing slowly open.

CUT TO:

355 PAT'S EYES

—fixed on that door.

CUT TO:

356 INT. BOBBY'S ROOM

Bobby (firmly): Otto, where are you getting the money for this?

Koster: Somewhere out of the future—it's nice not knowing exactly. (he hands Bobby a roll of bills) Why not draw on the future? We draw on the past. Why there are stars still shining that blew up ten thousand years ago—

Bobby (interrupting): Where are you getting this money?

Koster: Why—

Bobby: Tell me!

Koster (hesitating, then very simply): From Heinrich—it's Dr. Jaffé's Heinrich now. You see, he admired him so much…

CUT TO:

357 PAT'S ROOM

Pat's eyes wide and staring. Pat's head shaking from side to side in dismay.

CUT TO:

358 BOBBY'S ROOM

Bobby utterly sunk.

Bobby: That's worse than the money lenders.

Koster: I shouldn't have told you, you baby.

Bobby: This may be a matter of months, years.

CUT TO:

359 PAT'S ROOM

A nurse opening the door, looking at her, closing it. Pat's hand slowly comes out from under the covers.

CUT TO:

360 THE UPPER HALL

Bobby and Koster walking toward the head of the stairs.

CUT TO:

361 PAT'S ROOM

Pat's hand slowly taking off the bed clothes.

CUT TO:

362 THE LOBBY DOWNSTAIRS

A scattering of patients. Koster and Bobby pass through, meet Tony who shakes hands with Koster. Radio playing nervous music. “Heinrich” is visible through the front door.

CUT TO:

363 PAT ON THE SIDE OF HER BED

—slowly pulling herself erect, standing still a mo­ment and then stretching out her closed fists quickly toward the ceiling and reaching toward death—the only thing that can save her love, her high honor.

CUT TO:

364 EXT. THE INN

“Heinrich” racing from the door with the cut-out open.

CUT TO:

365 PANNING SHOT—BOBBY

—rushing through the lobby again, brushing past several patients and running upstairs, two steps at a time.

CUT TO:

366 PAT'S ROOM

Pat collapsed in a heap beside the bed, dying. Bobby coming in the door—seeing—going to her—

Bobby: Pat—oh, Pat. (he raises her, supports her. Pat's head wobbles on her shoulders) Help—somebody!

Pat (very low): It's all right—it's hard to die—but I'm quite full of love—like a bee is full of honey when it comes back to the hive in the evening.

On these words, before her eyes close in death, we—

FADE OUT.

367 FADE IN:

A SNOW-COVERED CEMETERY ON A HILL IN THE CITY—EVENING

Bobby and Koster, their eyes straight before them, are walking down a broad path. There is a faint glow in the sky and far away the unmistakable tp! tp! tp! tp! of a machine gun.

Koster: There's fighting in the city.

As they continue on, they are suddenly four instead of two—the shadowy figures of Pat and Lenz, grave and tender, walk beside them toward what­ever lies ahead.

FADE OUT.

THE END

Notes

1. Even though Breuer does not go to the beach, I think it is important that Bobby and Pat do not get married until after her hemorrhage.

(a) To examine this: If the hemorrhage occurs after the marriage, the implication is that Bobby has bought a piece of damaged goods, that he has been “stung,” and it lowers the tone of the whole romance, even though it is not Pat's fault. In that case their sub­sequent struggle is imposed on them by outside circumstances and is not nearly as romantic as if—

(b) He marries her on his own insistence in full knowledge of tragedy hanging over them. This is a challenge to the Gods, in full harmony with the romantic plane of the book.

2. It may be necessary to cut the first trip to the sanitarium to a mere scene in which Bobby puts Pat on the train—so as not to break up the murder-revenge sequence by taking interest too far away. But I am not at all sure about this because the murder is pretty strong, so have tentatively left in the trip which runs six pages.

Appendix: KOSTER'S PARLOR TRICK IN SCENE 48

Floating Sugar: Effect: A lump of sugar is set carefully in a cup of coffee. The sugar remains floating on the surface until the magician commands it to sink—which it does.

Method: Carefully drop a lump into the coffee so the lump rests on end. Do this in advance. The standing lump is not seen. Use it as a support for the lump which you show the spectators. As the lower lump melts, command the “floating” lump to sink—which it naturally does as the prop gives way.


Appendix A: Revisions
(Note: These are the revisions Fitzgerald protested in his 20 January 1938 letter to Mankiewicz.)

Sequence 278 (21 January 1938)

Pat: Is that the road home?

Erich: Yes. In May you'll be starting home along that road—

Pat (unbelievingly): In May—my God, in May. (a pause, then she turns to him) But we're not saying what we should be saying this first time together. (he looks at her puzzled) All these months I'd figured out what you would say and I would say—word for word. Do you want to hear? (he nods, smiling) We'd be sitting here on the foot of this bed like this, hand in hand, and you'd ask, what time is it and I'd say that doesn't matter now. We love each other beyond time and place now. And you'd say, that's right. God's in this room with us, lightning's in this room and the sea and the sky and the mountains are in this room with us. And you'd kiss me on the forehead and I'd say, how cool your lips are, don't move away— (he kisses her on the forehead) And you'd say, ought I to be in this room now? Aren't we breaking the rules? And I'd say must I start now—not breaking them— (he looks into her eyes, unsmiling) because I can't let you go and then you'd say hello, Pat, and I'd say, Erich, hello, and suddenly it would all be so real it would stab my heart and—

Erich: But—darling—

They embrace each other fiercely. The CAMERA TRUCKS over their heads to the window, until the window frames disappear and only the snow-covered mountains stand before us.

In the 21 December 1937 version (sequence 310) the scene reads:

Pat: Is that the road home?

Erich: Yes.

Pat: How far is it?

Erich: About five hundred miles. In May you'll be starting back along that road.

Pat (unbelievingly): In May—my God, in May.

Sequence 92 (21 January 1938)

INT. REPAIR SHOP—NIGHT

Pat is sitting on the running board of the taxi, which Koster is repairing. He is hammering out a fender which was badly bashed. Most of the damage has already been repaired. Koster punctuates his speech with hammer blows. The scene is illumi­nated by “Baby's” headlights.

Koster (tapping lightly): Well, what's wrong about Erich?

Pat (lazily lying down on the running board): Nothing's wrong about Erich. Erich's— (she restrains herself from saying more) all right. What's that you're playing with the hammer? Schubert?

Koster (tapping fancily): Mendelssohn—or do I offend your political beliefs? (she laughs) Let me give you Erich in a nutshell.

Pat: He'd look cute in a nutshell, but if you don't mind—

Koster (breaking in): Ability to make a living, better than average. Honesty—ten percent off for South America, but that leaves ninety. Spirit—all there is—

Pat: Otto, stick to your music. You're telling me things I know.

Koster: Then why don't you marry him?

Pat (after a moment—evasively): He hasn't asked me.

Koster: He's scared. Why don't you ask him?

He has stopped hammering and stands looking at her. She smiles up at him.

Pat: That was lovely music, Otto. Let's have some Beethoven—or no, I imagine Wagner's easier with a hammer

Koster hesitates a moment, then he goes back to his hammering, a little harder now.

Koster: You love each other—you've everything to live for. What if Germany has gone mad? You're sane. (he hammers once viciously) There's hope in both of you, and shelter for the future.

Pat: —and candy stars in a muslin sky. (she sits up and looks at Otto) Let's talk about something else, Otto.

Koster: It's each other you want, Pat—never mind about anything else. Half the troubles in the world come from worrying about what might happen.

Pat (suddenly emotional): But it wouldn't work! It wouldn't be fair to him!

Koster (quickly): Why not?

Pat (covering): I don't know. I—I guess I was born into irresponsibility. Then the war taught me not to take even that too seriously—I guess, Otto, nothing can ever be very important to me.

She sounds convincing enough. Koster quits working and goes over to her.

Koster: You mustn't ever lie to me, Pat.

Pat: No. I musn't. (getting up) So don't ask me any more questions.

Koster (levelly): I'll tell you what's the matter with you. You're scare of suffer­ing—scared of having any joy in your life, because it will make it all the harder when you lose it. You're afraid!

Pat: That's it, let's leave it at that!

She is desperately unhappy. Koster looks at her compassionately, but only because she is not look­ing at him.

Koster: Now you're not being fair, Pat. You've got to think of Erich, now. You're being a coward, you're being selfish—

Pat leans against the car. She doesn't look at him.

Pat (quietly): That's—not true.

Koster: Then—what is true, Pat?

Pat (after a moment, still without looking at him): I told you once I'd been very ill. I'm just patched up now. It will come back.

Koster looks at her as if his heart would break.

Koster: Your lungs?

She nods. He puts an arm around her, tenderly. She turns to him, suddenly.

Pat: Otto, don't let me marry him!

Koster: You've got to, Pat—

Pat: But he'll want a happiness that lasts! A home, children—a future that doesn't exist from day to day!

Koster: He wants you—

Pat: But I'm no good, he has a right to more than me!

Koster: Then live, Pat! Take the gamble! Stake your life against a love like yours and Erich's every time! You can only win—if it's an hour, Pat, you can only win!

Pat (after a moment): I'd have to tell him—

Koster: No. That's part of it. Don't make him afraid; just make him happy. Play to the limit—aim at the stars—

Slowly she walks to the window. She looks up at the sky. Koster follows her with his eyes.

Pat: Do you suppose they'd mind if we aimed at them? (she turns to Koster) I was told once that the very nearest star is forty million miles away—

In the 21 December 1937 version (sequences 110—113) the scene reads:

INT. PAT'S LIVING ROOM

Pat and Koster seated on opposite sides of tea wagon in front of fire. Koster leans over toward her and speaks with patient concern.

Koster: Pat—why don't you marry Erich? (Pat starts) You love him, don't you?

There is the sound of several chords being struck on the piano. The CAMERA PULLS BACK to show on the other side of the room the door open and a blond faded eager little man standing by the grand piano. Behind him in the doorway two mov­ing men are entering.

Blond Man: Oh, I beg your pardon—I can't keep my hands off it. I've brought my movers. They told me to come right in and get it.

Pat: That's all right.

CLOSE SHOT—PAT AND KOSTER

Pat (lying): It's too big for the apartment.

Koster understands too well but, full of his purpose he stands up and returns to his subject. His speech is several times punctuated by soft piano chords struck by the piano purchaser.

Koster: Think what you two have together—the one thing that is real and worthwhile in Germany today. That's what Erich needs—something real to live for. The world has somehow slipped away from Lenz and me—I don't want it to happen to Erich. If there was ever a time when love is the only thing to cling to—if you're lucky enough to have it—that time is now! (Eight piano chords struck here) And Erich is a special kind of man, Pat. He doesn't want just a sweetheart—he wants a wife. Not being married to you, he feels uncertain and insecure. He torments himself with the thought that he might lose you. Believe me—I know him.

He looks at Pat to see the effect of his speech.

CUT TO:

THE PIANO

—being pushed gently into the hall. The eager little man is walking beside it and now with one hand he reaches over and plays the first bars of “The Moonlight Sonata.”

CUT TO:

PAT—

Pat: What have I got to give him, Otto. Oh, it doesn't make sense—perhaps another kind of woman—who can give him a home and children.

Koster (interrupting passionately): No, Pat. You're the only possible woman for him.

Pat—now on her feet but not looking at Koster.

Pat (emotionally): Oh, can't we just go on as we are? Because Otto, even if what you say is true it still wouldn't be fair to him.

Koster reacts sharply to this, sits down, looks at her a moment in silence. Pat drops her gaze sadly, then looks up at him. Koster takes her hand in his.

Koster: Pat—is it your lungs?

Pat: Yes.

Koster: I see.

Pat: I'm merely patched up. I have to live very carefully. It may come back.

Koster (looks at her narrowly): And it may not. Take the gamble, Pat. Stake a love like yours and Erich's against your life every time! Don't you see that whatever happens—neither of you can lose?: (Pat looks up enquiringly—a piano chord from the doorway is bright and challenging): Take your happiness with both hands—and even if it breaks—you will know—that you've had the only thing worth having in this world.

Pat: I'd have to tell him.

Koster: No, no. That's part of the gamble. Don't worry him. Don't spoil his happiness by bringing fear into it. Play it up to the limit—aim at the stars!

Pat (sadly): The stars—they're so far away.

The piano, out of the room now echoes with one sad, minor chord like a goodbye, as we—

DISSOLVE TO:

Sequence 91 (21 January 1938)

INT. ALFONS' BAR—NOON

Lenz and Erich face each other across a table. Erich, in an oil-stained undershirt, is gulping a dish of stew. Lenz, similarly attired, sits over his coffee. He watches Erich swallow his food—

Lenz (thoughtfully): What is it about love that makes a man swallow his food whole instead of chewing it?

Erich (not looking up): Huh?

Lenz (indicating the stew): That all belongs to you. Nobody's going to steal it. I've had my lunch— (he steals a piece of meat with his fingers) What's going to happen with you and Pat?

Erich: Why should anything happen?

Lenz: You're in love. Why don't you get married?

Erich: We're in love. Isn't that enough?

Lenz: No. You're as fed up with drifting as I am. Somewhere there's a battle going on, and I'm not in it—and somewhere there's a home to be made, and love to be had—

Erich: Well?

Lenz: Marry Pat—

Erich (suddenly): How can I? Don't you think I've wanted to, don't you know it's the only thing I want? What have I got to offer a girl like that? Nothing now, and nothing to look forward to—

Lenz: Marry her, anyway. Then you'll both have that—

Erich: It's not enough to give her—

Lenz: No one will ever have any more. (he gets up, puts a hand on Erich's shoulder) This is the right time, believe me. And sometimes it comes—and goes so quickly that you've lost it forever—

He leaves. Erich looks after him.

In the 21 December 193 7 version (sequence 109) the scene reads:

INT. ALFONS' BAR—NOON

Erich, in an oilstained undershirt, sprawls along a bench in a booth, his arm black to the elbow with grease. Poised above him stands Lisa, a good-looking girl, part time manicurist and a full time tramp. A manicure case rests beside her as she looks at Erich with admiration.

Lenz sits alone over his coffee at the next table. Bobby is in a relaxed mood.

Lisa (looking at his arms): Of course, you can't eat your lunch like that. I think it's a good thing I happened to come in. (a waiter sets a bowl of steaming water on the table. She takes off her coat and during the following dialogue sets to work cleaning Erich's arms) Thanks… I wouldn't know those was the same hands that play the piano so beautiful for us. (eyes his hands determinedly) This is going to be some job.

Lenz (who is also a little greasy): Nobody ever did that for me.

Lisa: Erich's different. He's really just a boy, aren't you, dear?

Erich (Shrinking from her ministrations): Oh, cut it out! I want to drink a beer and get back to work.

Lisa: Now you just sit quiet.

(She opens her case and after fumbling with lingerie, produces a battered manicure set. Lenz watches cynically as she sets to work)

Lenz: Erich is unhappy, Lisa. You can't reach him thru his finger­nails.

Lisa (quickly ruining three towels on Erich): There—at least I can see your arms. Why is he unhappy?

Lenz: He has Hamlet's trouble—to be or not to be?

Erich (to Lenz): Cut it out—will you!

Lisa: Now you sit quiet while I get more water.

She goes o.s.

Lenz: Why not face it? You're as fed up with drifting along as I am. Somewhere there's a battle going on and I'm not in on it, and somewhere there's a home to be made and love to be had.

Erich: Is that a reference to me?

Lenz: Don't get jumpy. You know it's true—how long have you known Pat?

Erich: About two months.

Lenz: They why don't you marry her?

Erich (astounded): Me marry Pat? What have I got to offer a girl like that? Living from hand to mouth—no prospects. She'd never marry me in a thousand years.

Lisa comes back into scene.

Lisa: Who wouldn't marry you? I don't blame them. It wouldn't be fair to all the other girls.

Lenz: Come on, Lisa. You know Erich never made love to you.

Lisa (wistfully): Well, he always has that look—as if he was just going to.

Lenz gets up and comes over to Erich.

Lenz (hand on Erich's shoulder): I know the obstacles—I know everything you're thinking—

Lisa: Now give me your hand. (resentfully to Lenz) How do you know what Erich's thinking?

Lenz (paying no attention): —but sometimes the right time comes—and then goes so quickly that you've lost it forever.

Sequence 66 (21 January 1938)

INT. REPAIR SHOP

as Lenz enters. Erich sits disconsolately at the desk. He looks up without much interest.

Lenz (spilling coins on desk): Three marks' profit over and above the water pump, which died, and the cost of the license and cap. (as he takes off the cap) Drunks tip the best, and old ladies don't tip at all. There's a moral there, somewhere. Here's the cap.

Erich doesn't answer, but continues looking gloomily off into space.

Lenz: What's the matter with you?

Erich (slowly): I'm in a mess. I've completely ruined myself with Pat. That's what I've done. (Lenz looks at Erich amused, while he goes through his pockets for a cigarette) She's probably used to millionaires and counts and how they behave. I acted like a drunken sot.

Lenz (laughs): What do you think millionaires act like—millionaires? It's too bad, though. I guess I should have stayed at Alfons' to take care of you. (with a touch of seriousness) That might have been better—for all of us.

Erich looks up sharply. It is his turn now to be alarmed.

Erich: What happened at your meeting—another riot?

Lenz (shakes his head): But some of the busy little book-burners followed me home.

Erich: Oh— (back to his own troubles) Gottfried, you know about such things—South America, and all that. What does a man do—how does he apologize?

Lenz: He doesn't. If you're going to apologize for everything that goes wrong in this world, who'll start it?

Erich: But I behaved like an idiot!

Lenz: Send flowers. They cover everything. Even graves. (he claps the taxi cap on Erich's head) Come on, go to work— (as they move to the door) Be careful of that radiator—don't take anybody up hills—Together they exit from office.

Sequence 121 (21 January 1938)

Erich: There, you see. I was afraid of that. You're bored—

Pat: No, I'm not—

Erich: You will be, soon. What on earth are we going to talk about for the rest of our lives?

Pat (turns back, smiling now): You—

Erich: Twelve minutes, by the clock—

Pat: Me, then—

Erich: We couldn't talk. We'd have to sing—

Pat: Darling. Books and music. They're always safe—

Erich: I don't know anything about books, and I don't know any­thing about music—

Pat: I'll teach you. It's time you went to school—

Sequence 122 (21 January 1938)

Pat: Listen. A cuckoo bird—

Erich: That makes three of us—

Pat: I've been counting. For every time he calls—you have that number of years to live—

Erich: There's a better one than that. When a cuckoo calls, rattle your money and it multiplies—

Pat: Eighteen, nineteen, twenty—

Erich: Only I haven't got any money to rattle. That cuckoo's making a fool of himself—

Pat: Twenty three, twenty four, twenty five—

Erich: Imagine. Our silver wedding. Our beautiful daughter has married the only millionaire left in the world, and gone to the North Pole to live—

Pat: Twenty eight, twenty nine—

Erich: Our handsome son and heir has left college, and refused to go to war. Thrown into jail for the rest of his life—

Pat: Thirty one, thirty two—

Erich: We are now all alone again—a sweet, silver-haired old couple— (he gets up) I'm hungry. You can come back tomorrow, and count cuckoos all day—


Preface and Afterword